Pop Up Artist Kathy Ostrander Roberts

Featured Artist, Kathy Ostrander Roberts is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, June 5  through Monday, June 11. Read on to learn more about her inspiration, her process, and her work.

June 5 – June 11

Kathy is an established Maine artist working in the ancient medium of encaustic. She combines beeswax, powdered pigments, and dammar resin into her ocean-inspired paintings on birch wood panel. She is the owner and operator of Mousam River Gallery, a Maine based art studio.

Ostrander shares, “My goal is to represent the essence of Maine coastal waters in encaustic painting, by capturing scenes from the coastline of Southern Maine and translating them into vibrant representations of movement and color.  Through layering and sculpting of the medium, I create depth and intrigue. My hope is to spark memories and longings for Maine’s rugged shores in the hearts and eyes of the viewer.”

Kathy lives and works in Kennebunk, Maine, and is an avid sailor. Kennebunk, however, is not the only place that influences her work. Monhegan Island, Port Clyde, and Boothbay are also some of her favorite places to find inspiration.

With over 30 years of experience working in the arts, she is a member of the Pastel Painters of Maine, Kennebunk Art Guild, Maine Women in the Arts, International Encaustics Association and the New Hampshire Art Association. Kathy has exhibited at numerous shows throughout New England.

Roberts will be showing her work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from June 5 to June 11. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about Roberts and her work, follow this link to her website. www.mousamrivergallery.me

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Pop Up Artist Valerie McCaffrey from Garden Guardians

Featured Artist, Valerie McCaffrey from Garden Guardians is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, June 12  through Monday, June 18. Read on to learn more about her inspiration, her process, and her work.

June 12  –  June 18

I love making these planters. I actually enjoy popping out of bed in the morning and putting on my old work clothes and carving concrete. I spend my day putting smiles on faces. It is a joy and I am grateful that I have the opportunity to do it.

I am repeatedly asked how I started making Garden Guardians.  To make a long story short, it started with a strong desire to have more insight and clarity into my own and others behavior. This led me to working for over two decades in an artist journal.  My takeaway from that practice is that underneath all the longings, struggles and constant B.S is a source of peace, strength, and tranquility.   I want every Garden Guardian that comes out of my studio to celebrate, attract and be a reminder of this state of joyful equanimity.  When we are in touch with that source big magic happens.

McCaffrey will be showing her work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from June 12 to June 18. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about McCaffrey and her work, follow this link to her website. Garden Guardians

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Pop Up Artist Suzanne Anderson

Featured Artist, Suzanne Anderson is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, June 12 through Monday, June 18. Read on to learn more about her inspiration, her process, and her work.

  

JUNE 12  –  JUNE 18

I work in a wooded lakeside studio in Maine. It’s the perfect place to become immersed in creative exploration.  In the incredible beauty of my surroundings, I find myself powerfully drawn to the landscape. In 2016 I began a series of drawings at a micro scale. Closely examining and recording with drawings and photographs the tiny colorful lichen and fungus that abound in the forest and field. These drawings have been used in my enamel work, in my textile design work and in a further series of drawings that incorporate natural elements and sometimes humanoid characters. This continuing series is undertaken with an underlining response to worries over human rights and environmental issues. My work is a continuance of study along the lines of developing a symbolic language of expression that walks the line between abstract form and recognizable, though unusual, elements.

The drawing process is often started on an iPad with a stylus.  After roughing out, my work is completed on a larger screen and finally printed in small editions on high quality, acid-free, Epson Velvet paper. I work back into the prints with hand embroidered line, wool roving and sometimes found objects. The use of sewn line introduces the hand back into a digital drawing and hearkens back to traditional “women’s work”.

While centered around lichen, mosses, and fungus, this work also explores the inner and outer landscape through the abstraction of the natural forms.  The tiny little arrangements and the incredible variety of these lifeforms offer lovely surprises to the senses. The life cycle through to decay creates endless fascination. These observations come back to me in my studio not only through my 2d work but also through the medium of jewelry.  My jewelry work has a natural, casual, organic feeling. It relates to color and form to the tiny worlds of nature that I am so captivated by.

The beautiful vitreous (hot glass) enamel colors and edges promote a feeling of transition, a going back to nature, a beautiful decay. In my jewelry, I use a variety of enameling techniques in the creation of my pieces. Sgraffito, sifting, painting, graphite drawing and gold leaf are a few of the techniques I employ in my enamel work. I use hand formed and forged sterling silver, copper, and brass in my chain and findings. Each piece is finished on the edges. The non-enameled metals are either left with a satin finish or have a patina applied and are sealed with a museum quality protective wax.

To see more of Suzanne Anderson’s work, visit her webpage www.suzanneanderson.me

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Pop Up Artist Zeraph Dylan Moore

Featured Artist, Zeraph Dylan Moore is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, June 12 through Monday, June 18. Read on to learn more about his inspiration, his process, and his work.

June 12  –  June 18

My artwork emulates industrial decay, archaeological artifacts, and processes of geologic change. As a child and teenager, I loved building things out of abandoned materials and exploring ruined houses and strange, forgotten places. I loved old things, deeply worn with texture and meaning.

In the past several years, I’ve become disabled with a chronic illness called CFS-ME. I no longer explore a lot of abandoned buildings and am mostly housebound. Much of my work is created in bed. For this reason, working at a small size – usually just 5” x 5” – is ideal.

My artwork has been represented in many private collections throughout Maine and the world since I was 16 years old.

Moore will be showing his work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from June 12 to June 18. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about Moore and his work, follow this link to his website Grind Studio

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Pop Up Artist Garry D Harley

Featured Artist, Garry D. Harley is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, June 26 through Monday, July 2.

Garry Harley is an American artist, born in Denver, Colorado and raised in Nebraska who currently lives and works in Concord, Massachusetts, USA (west of Boston). He is a trained architect and his OP-ART prints and paintings have been selected for display in the last two Faber Birren National Colour Award Show’s conducted by The Stamford Art Association.

Check out his website

http://garryharleystudios.com

Pop Up Artist Christopher O’Connor

Featured Artist, Christopher O’Connor is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, July 3  through Monday, July 9. Read on to learn more about his inspiration, his process, and his work.

July 3-July 9

Ever since I was a child I wanted to be an artist. There was always something magical, alchemical about the process of conjuring up an image with the simplest of means. I loved how colors could be mixed and in the process create new colors. How brushes and pens could be wielded to create whole new worlds. How when you didn’t have the words to express yourself you had color and shape and light and shade. Drawing and painting seemed like the most natural thing in the world to do.

Over the years I have found myself drawn to a diverse range of artists and styles. I have played and experimented with many and in the process I have come to understand that the artworks that I am most captivated by all have similar qualities – a strong compositional sense, layered coloring, a vibrant surface quality, restrained intensity – add to these the dogged determination to work on a piece until it is finished and you have works of art that are enduring and endlessly engaging. It is with these considerations that I approach my practice of making paintings.

With my current body of work, my intention is to create works that elicit a quiet sense of balance and calm in the viewer. Pictorial compositions that contain a solid architectonic syntax have always made an impact on me. Through the use of vibrant coloring and rigorously constructed compositions, I strive to compose paintings that conjure up an immediate visual impact, one that slowly gives way to engagement with the detail and structure implicit in each painting. It is through the surface quality of the paint and within the distilled composition of the painting that the intention of my work is revealed.

O’Connor will be showing his work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from July 3 to July 9. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about Christopher O’Connor and his work, follow this link to his website. www.christopheroconnorpainting.com

Pop Up Artist Phil Laughlin

Featured Artist, Phil Laughlin is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, July 10  through Monday, July 16. Read on to learn more about his inspiration, his process, and his work.

July 10-July 16

“The idea that man has a relationship with nature has been with us all along. What’s new is our understanding of the complexities and subtleties of that relationship and the role we play in that balance. When I observe a landscape subject with my 21st-century painter’s eyes, I am aware not only of how nature has shaped us but how we have had a reciprocal impact on nature.” Phil Laughlin

Phil Laughlin was born in the Finger Lakes region of New York.  Like most kids, he enjoyed drawing, but you wouldn’t have guessed from his childhood that art would become his passion.  At home, the idea of a career in the arts was never discussed.  School offered one art course in 12 years of public education.  The prevailing attitude was “Okay… We’ve checked the art box on the curriculum form, let’s move on to the real business of life.”

 

His academic strengths were math and science so it seemed like engineering would be a good course of study at college.  This seemingly straightforward plan collided with the social upheaval of the late 1960’s. In the second year at SUNY Stony Brook, he began to question his career path in the counterculture-style of the times.  Doing something in the creative arts seemed more meaningful than building rockets, so he switched majors to studio arts.

When he graduated from Worcester Museum Art School, Abstract Impressionism was relinquishing the spotlight.  Several other art movements emerged in rapid succession.  The ones exploring newfound notions of realism were of most interest.  He moved to New York City and continued to paint.  The need for employment pushed him to study applied arts and work as a graphic designer.

Creatively, commercial design work wasn’t very fulfilling, but the opportunities presented by the city itself and the exposure Manhattan offered to new ideas and new standards of artistic professionalism were their own reward.  World-class galleries and museums were in abundance.  He passionately consumed it all.

In 1986, Phil moved his family to the beautiful green mountain state of Vermont.  At the same time, desktop computers hit the scene.  After a period of experimentation, he found himself gravitating towards illustration software, rendering product, and technical subjects.  Painting time had to share with work time while he raised his family.  Children grew, moved out, and he gradually rebalanced his schedule to once again favor landscape painting.

Along the way, he discovered the rich tradition of New England painting built by generations of artists.  Casting aside the last bit of guilt over leaving the formal concerns of modern abstraction behind, he joined other contemporary artists working with and extending that tradition.

Currently, he paints local scenes from his rural home in Williston, Vermont.

Laughlin will be showing his work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from July 10 to July 16. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about Laughlin and his work, follow this link to his website. www.phillaughlinart.com

“Anything else you’re interested in is not going to happen if you can’t breathe the air and drink the water. Don’t sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet.”- Carl Sagan

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Pop Up Artist Chris Ploof

Due to unforeseen circumstances Chris Ploof will not be joining us at Pop Up this summer.

We encourage you to read on to learn more about his inspiration, his process, and his work.

Hailing from a small town in Massachusetts, award-winning master jeweler Chris Ploof was once a skinny boy lurking around the local living history museum, watching awestruck as the craftspeople manipulated what had previously seemed unyielding: glass, tin, iron.

After traveling the world trying hands-on careers that spoke to his historical influences and technical skills, Chris found himself back on his boyhood path, attempting to make a forge improvised by a 55-gallon drum, some fire bricks, and a hairdryer. Eventually, his knowledge seeking lead him to jewelry making classes. At last, he was home.

Chris has studied with many well-known artists and apprenticed under a master goldsmith. He has an insatiable curiosity and drive that lead him down long roads even after the challenges at hand have been met.

The Santa Fe Symposium has chosen Chris twice to receive the Industry Leader Award, He has a series of instructional videos through Interweave, his work is on the cover of Showcase 500 Rings: New Directions in Art Jewelry (Lark, 2012) and in countless other publications, and he travels frequently as a consultant to the jewelry industry. His studio is located in Massachusetts, where he works with a carefully chosen, fun team of like-minded talent.

“I love exploring new techniques and materials, especially pushing the envelope of current and traditional techniques. Challenges always seem to lead down long roads even after they have been resolved and spawn future ideas and designs. ‘Impossible’ is only a temporary condition.”

For more info about Ploof and his work, follow this link to his website. www.chrisploof.com

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Pop Up Artist Cynthia Woehrle

Featured Artist, Cynthia Woehrle is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, July 17 through Monday, July 23. Read on to learn more about her inspiration, her process, and her work.

July 17 – July 23

Landscape in oil is the medium in which my artistic themes are expressed. Each landscape represents the memory of an emotion and my aim is to present a scene that has a ground but also has an ephemeral and floating feeling to evoke a dreamlike memory. I am fixated on the subtleties of the atmosphere, which I layer in glazes of paint. Each work develops its own temperament; some complicated and heavy, others light, loose and confident.

Contradiction is also a theme, associating lights and darks in the atmosphere with both positive and negative implications. For example, with darkness, there is an acknowledgment of the negative and an appreciation for its beauty and solace. Darkness symbolizes repression and withholding but at the same time, and importantly, darkness brings comfort and rest. Light, a symbol of hope and renewal, is a focal point that disrupts this rest. In depicting the sky, I can explore a full circle of human emotion through light and atmosphere.

The moon is a subject within the contradiction theme that I began exploring at a time of forced reaction about the meaning of life and death. Ever changing, the moon’s presence is mysterious and is often contradictory in symbolism. This makes the search for absolute truths impossible. There is always another answer, another perspective. Philosophers grasp at answers in an effort to understand life but all that is true is the journey and what is discovered along the way.

Woehrle will be showing her work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from July 17 to July 23. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about Woehrle and her work, follow this link to her website. www.cynthiawoehrle.com

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Pop Up Artist Erika Manning

Featured Artist, Erika Manning is the guest artist for Pop Up beginning Tuesday, July 24 through Monday, July 30. Read on to learn more about her inspiration, her process, and her work.

“It’s good to have an end to journey toward, but it’s the journey that matters, in the end.” Ursula K. LeGuin

JUNE 24 to JULY 30

The work of Erika Manning examines her deep connection to nature and to the Maine landscape. Her paintings although abstract, are directly inspired by Maine’s gorgeous clear light, the colors of pine trees, ocean, and lobster buoys, as well as the shapes of rock, islands, topographical maps, and boats.

Although she strives for a finished piece, the beauty for her is in the process of making art. Starting out with beginner mind, an initial gesture and relying heavily on the random acts of chance and the correct alignment of time and space: the image shifts as the rhythms and cycles of seasons, nature, earth. life and tides are evoked. The final image is a map of the passage of time, the paths taken, the colors chosen, the shapes drawn, of the emotional weather and the conversations with the piece itself.

Manning will be showing her work at Pop Up on Maine Art Hill at 5 Chase Hill Rd. in Kennebunk from July 24 to July 30. The gallery is open every day at 10 am. For more info about Manning and her work, follow this link to her website. www.erikamanningart.com

 

 

 

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