Something Small for the Holidays

12/15/2016 0 Comments
 

Even though Kennebunkport’s Christmas Prelude is all wrapped up, there are still many retailers here in the Kennebunks who are still celebrating this holiday season. Restaurants and shops throughout Kennebunk and Kennebunkport are open for business and would love to see you before the new year strikes.

In the past, there has been interest expressed in smaller works for the holidays, so that’s what we have done. Over the last few weeks, our gallery at 14 Western Avenue has been arranged to help you find just what you need. The entire first floor is dedicated to “Small Works.” All pieces are 20” x 20” or smaller and have been grouped by artist. They are easy to find and offer a variety of styles and mediums to meet your personal tastes.

fullsizerender-5 fullsizerender-6 fullsizerender-2

These may not be stocking stuffers by definition, but they certainly would be a pleasant surprise to anyone who finds one under their tree. There are a few watercolors by Susan Wahlrab, Ellen Welch Granter is represented by both her birds and her boats, and William B. Hoyt has more of the 6″ x 8″‘s that sold so quickly during his show this summer. Alex Dunwoodie just dropped off a few brand new works that are a perfect fit. You will also find a handful of pieces contributed by Sandra L. Dunn and Jeffrey T. Fitzgerald for this perfect holiday show.

fullsizerender-4 fullsizerender-3 fullsizerender

Of course, we have our entire collection of works from all your favorite artists upstairs. Many new pieces have arrived over the course of the fall and certainly deserve a visit. However, if you can’t get to Maine and need some assistance, please check out our website. It is updated daily with new work. Remember – we are available daily by phone, as well. 207-967-2803. We are open every day and happy to help.

Happy Holidays to All!

Additional Artists Include: Rebecca KinkeadCraig Mooney, Liz Hoag, Karen McManus, Holly ReadyJanis H. Sanders,  James Rivington Pyne, Barbara Jones Peabody, Abbie Williams, Trip Park, Margaret Gerding, Philip Frey, Jill Valliere and David Witbeck.

Please share this on your own social media by clicking the icons below.

And Prelude Continues…

12/08/2016 0 Comments
 

img_6530 img_6529 img_6526

Prelude is still going strong here in the Kennebunks, but now we are decorated in snow. For those who missed it last weekend, we are doing it all over again! There are added activities and new fun events, so check out the link to the schedule below, and come in and visit us here at Maine Art.

img_6537image1image2

REPOST FROM SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3rd

It is that time of year again! Kennebunk and Kennebunkport are coming alive with holiday spirit.  Over the course of the last few days, greens have been cut, bows tied and lights strung.  The town looks fabulous and is more than ready to greet the influx of locals and tourists soon to arrive to kick off this holiday season with Christmas Prelude. Here at Maine Art, we are excited to be a part of it.

Please stop in on the Fridays and Saturdays of Prelude to share in some cookies, hot chocolate, and of course, our holiday show of small works. The entire first floor of the gallery is dedicated to smaller works, pieces that are 20” by 20” or smaller.  With over twenty artists represented, it is easy to choose the perfect holiday gift or wonderful addition to your home as you celebrate this season. This collection will be displayed every day through December 31 at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture at 14 Western Ave.

img_6532

As part of Prelude, we are participating in The Village Art Walk. This event is coordinated by the Kennebunk-Kennebunkport-Arundel Chamber of Commerce and local art galleries, beginning Friday, Dec. 9th and continuing thru Saturday, Dec. 10th. The “Passport to Prelude” includes 10 participating galleries. To get your “Prelude Passport” stamped, visit 6 of the 10 participating Village Art Walk galleries for your chance to win prizes of art!

Pick up your free Passport at participating galleries or the Chamber of Commerce Kiosk, 1 Chase Hill Road, Kennebunk, right next door to Maine Art. You can also click here to print a copy. Passports must be returned to the Chamber of Commerce kiosk by 5 p.m. Dec. 10 to be entered into the drawing for 16 prizes! Click here for more details about the Art Walk.

img_65461 img_65144 img_65412

We look forward to seeing you during this festive season. If you have any questions, feel free to call us at 207-967-2803. We are open seven days a week. Check out our website for hours. www.maine-art.com.

Happy Holidays in the Kennebunks

12/03/2016 0 Comments
 

treelighting

It is that time of year again! Kennebunk and Kennebunkport are coming alive with holiday spirit.  Over the course of the last few days, greens have been cut, bows tied and lights strung.  The town looks fabulous and is more than ready to greet the influx of locals and tourists soon to arrive to kick off this holiday season with Christmas Prelude. Here at Maine Art, we are excited to be a part of it. Please stop in on the Fridays and Saturdays of Prelude to share in some cookies, hot chocolate, and of course, our holiday show of small works. The entire first floor of the gallery is dedicated to smaller works, pieces that are 20” by 20” or smaller.  With over twenty artists represented, it is easy to choose the perfect holiday gift or wonderful addition to your home as you celebrate this season. This collection will be displayed every day through December 31 at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture at 14 Western Ave. As part of Prelude, we are participating in The Village Art Walk. This event is coordinated by the Kennebunk-Kennebunkport-Arundel Chamber of Commerce and local art galleries, beginning Friday, Dec. 9th and continuing thru Saturday, Dec. 10th. The “Passport to Prelude” includes 10 participating galleries. To get your “Prelude Passport” stamped, visit 6 of the 10 participating Village Art Walk galleries for your chance to win prizes of art! Pick up your free Passport at participating galleries or the Chamber of Commerce Kiosk, 1 Chase Hill Road, Kennebunk, right next door to Maine Art. You can also click here to print a copy. Passports must be returned to the Chamber of Commerce kiosk by 5 p.m. Dec. 10 to be entered into the drawing for 16 prizes! Click here for more details about the Art Walk. We look forward to seeing you during this festive season. If you have any questions, feel free to call us at 207-967-2803. We are open seven days a week. Check out our website for hours. www.maine-art.com.

And the winner is…

12/03/2016 0 Comments
 

Congratulations to Gail Sanders our 2016 Wind Sculpture Photo Contest Winner!

15327249_1271773479511569_8287290050282315657_n

A Memorial for Francesca

11/24/2016 4 Comments
 

14937367_1545193512165212_4232305106319185878_n

There is so much to be thankful for here at Maine Art. We have a tremendous staff, a fabulous clientele, and some of the most talented artists in this part of the country. It took all of this for us to be where we are today.  The hard work and effort of all of these people does not go unrecognized. However, on this day, when we look deep inside and say ‘thank you’ to all who have made us who we are, our hearts and thoughts go immediately to Francesca Spain, who passed away this fall.

Francesca joined the Maine Art family, literally and figuratively, in 1995. Since then, she has touched the lives of so many in the Kennebunk area and beyond. Many of us were blessed with her smiling face on an extended visit to Kennebunk this summer. From walking her favorite beaches to eating at her favorite restaurants, she and her friends celebrated well. Her happiness and lust for life was contagious and her visit was a wonderful one.

“We cross paths with people throughout our lives sometimes never knowing the full impact a person has on you until you no longer travel on the same path,” says Natalie Lane, Gallery Manager at Maine Art. “I am blessed to have been able to call Francesca a good friend and will miss her dearly.”

“I never imagined when I took a new job at the gallery twelve years ago that I would be gaining a family. Francesca was a huge inspiration to me and always offered wonderful support and advice,” says Amy Lewia, Gallery Director. “I have so many wonderful memories of her,  which I cherish now more than ever. I am so grateful I was lucky enough to have her in my life.”

Since her death, we have been inundated with messages and phone calls from all over the country, from folks expressing sorrow and sympathy and sharing memories of Francesca. “She was a remarkable woman, and Maine Art would not be what it is today without her love, support and hard work. We are all profoundly sad,” said John Spain.

We wanted to make sure you were all aware of the memorial service for Francesca that will be held Saturday, November 26th at The Beachmere Inn in Ogunquit, Maine from 2-5 pm. If you wish, donations to hospice can be made in Francesca’s name.

15036753_1249020801786837_2136043999604532368_n

Francesca, age 56, passed away suddenly on Thursday, November 3, 2016 in Lakeland, Florida. She was born on April 7, 1960 in Grosse Pointe, Michigan to Peter J. Tarantino and Patricia (Pratt) Whitten. Francesca co-owned and operated Maine Art Gallery in Kennebunk for many years. Francesca moved to Sebring, Florida three years ago from Kennebunk. She was involved in a recovery community and had a love for people. She worked at the YMCA, volunteered for therapeutic horseback riding, and was also a member of The Elks Club in Sebring. She worked for hospice in Maine with a passion for her work. She enjoyed calling and playing bingo, bicycling, running, hiking, bowling, canoeing and traveling. She also loved music, reading, writing and some painting. She was very proud of the opportunity to be an organ donor. Survivors include her parents, sister: Theresa Haggett of Poland Spring; brother: John Vince Tarantino of Gloucester, MA and nieces: Maryssa Haggett and Kayla Haggett. Francesca was preceded in death by her brother, Isadore Tarantino.

A Different Kind of Boat Builder – David Riley Peterson

11/18/2016 0 Comments
 

6315940

The birth of David Riley Peterson’s boats was an interesting one. To say ‘one thing lead to another’ is an understatement, but it is still the best way to describe his ‘AH-HA’ moment.

Riley explains, “I was asked to make an olive tray for a local gift shop. Not seeing much challenge in it, I procrastinated until the third request. I returned to my studio and, reluctantly, rolled out a small thin slab of clay and folded it into a simple tray and joined the ends. It was a waste of my awesome talent.” Staring at it in dismay and disgust the little pod transformed. “I held it in my hands, and the ‘AH-HA’ moment occurred. The clay spoke and in a meek, shy voice it said, ‘I want to be a boat.’ Ever since that moment, I am a devoted (clay) boat builder,” laughs Peterson.

x0wbrqvcae0c4sobzxtq

His past and present blend a love of boats with playing in the mud. He is the first to admit that clay just suits his personality. Born in Beverly, Massachusetts, he was always reprimanded for playing in every mud puddle he could find. Growing up, there were no art classes, let alone ceramics, offered in school.

“I was clueless about clay until I went off to college. My dorm at the University of Florida was located across the street from the ceramics department. I was always curious about the group of students who entered and left the building dressed in dirty jeans or tattered shorts with every body part covered in clay; so I investigated,” says Peterson. “What I discovered instantly changed my life, and I could hardly wait until the next semester to enroll in my first ceramics class; ‘Introduction to Clay.’ I was not disappointed.”

Peterson went on to graduate with a BFA in Ceramics/Sculpture, own his own studio and teach. Since 1984, he has also been the President of Peterson Marine Surveys. Two careers that appear to be quite different, Peterson effectively merges into one life.

Peterson’s father was originally from Maine, and the family often came north during the summer. He remembers spending that time playing with boats. “Maine is a real fishing community. They used dories for fishing and pulling nets in, and stuff like that, but mostly lobstering. These boats were iconic watercraft years ago.” It wasn’t a stretch to add Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture to Peterson’s list of galleries.  His boats fit perfectly between images of seascapes and rocky coasts. The life-like quality he brings to his clay captures locals and tourists alike, and are a beautiful reminder of life in Maine.

12495138_1695774554027774_3726719762399048894_n

Come and see David Riley Peterson’s work in person at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk, Maine. We are open year-round. You can also view his work on our website at his Artist Page, David Riley Peterson at Maine Art. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call. 207-967-2803

Click the icons below to share this on your own social media.

What’s Up with the Wind Sculptures!?

11/10/2016 0 Comments
 

 lyman-225x300

There are so many exciting and new goings on with Maine Art and Whitaker Studio, we thought we would take the time to catch you up.

Last week, Maine Art had the chance to get up close and personal with Whitaker Studio.  Not only were we able to see the studio and peek at the process, but we also spent some time with the staff. Thanks to a quick stop in St. Louis and a serious freezer stocking of Pappy’s BBQ, we treated them to a rib feed and caught up with the personal and professional side of the studio. They are a dedicated, hardworking and incredibly talented bunch.

Ironically, they were packing up a big ole crate with a Kennebunk shipping label.  Forty-five original Lyman Whitaker Wind Sculptures were snug inside, including a few of the new Gemini. Building a crate to hold this valuable cargo is almost as much of an art form as the sculptures themselves.

14906901_1237721519583432_4552138579394932378_n

Getting a good look at the new Gemini was another perk of the visit. The two double helix forms sitting at the top of the sculpture are hand cut to fit and interact perfectly with each other. When spinning, they never touch, but move so close they seem as one, like the twins they are named for. This new sculpture stands over ten feet tall and four feet wide.  The twins move independent of each other, while the bottom wind wheel rotates the entire sculpture.  The sculpture is not on the website as of yet, but a photo rendering can be seen on Maine Art Gallery’s Facebook Page, and of course outside of Maine Art on Western Ave. in Kennebunk.

Don’t forget! If you are planning to purchase a sculpture for the holiday gift-giving season, you must have your order in by December 9th to guarantee delivery for Christmas. Delivery will only be guaranteed for Small through X-Large sculptures that are in stock at the studio. You can of course visit the gallery and take one home with you as late as 1:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve.

Last, but certainly not least, is our Wind Sculpture Photo Contest! On November 14th, the 12 finalists’ photos will be posted on our Facebook Page, and you, our fans, can vote for your favorite. The finalist who’s photo receives the most “likes” as of 10 a.m. EST on Friday, December 2, will be this year’s winner of a Desert Flame by Lyman Whitaker.

Parsons

Throughout the holiday season the gallery will be open from 10am – 5pm every day. Please stop by and visit – new artwork arrives frequently and there is almost always something new to see. Our website is updated daily and is also a wonderful source for up-to-date inventory. www.maine-art.com  If we can help in anyway, never hesitate to call. 207-967-2803.

Follow this link to see all of Lyman Whitaker’s Wind Sculptures –  kennebunkportwindsculptures.com

Follow this link to read more about Whitaker Studio – Whitaker Studio Insights and Stories

Click the icons below to share this on your own social media.

In the Studio – Time with Craig Mooney

11/03/2016 0 Comments
 

img_0695

Visiting artists in their studios is one of our favorite things to do. Seeing each individual, how they work, what their space looks like, and the process they go through gives us a better understanding of the artist and their final works.

“No artist works the same way. I am always amazed at the range of style and personality that comes through on a studio visit,” says John Spain, owner of Maine Art. “From organization to process to space, each artist visit truly is a unique experience.”

When visiting Craig Mooney in Stowe, Vermont, this generalization held true.  Craig has a fabulous space off a small gallery in Stowe.  It is large and bright, and has become more than just his space, but part of his process.  In the very center of his studio is a large rectangular table that holds his brushes and paint. No matter what it looks like to the outsider, it is organized chaos to him.

img_0698

“Typically when I finish a collection of works that have to go to a gallery, I need to go through and reorganize. As you can see, things end up in a messy state,” claims Mooney.  “It’s a system, believe it or not. I know where the location of certain pigments are, even though it doesn’t look it,” Craig laughs as he explains. “I can tell you that there’s definitely a cadmium green over there somewhere, a Van Dyke brown on this side…” Mooney waves his hands as he shows off his system.  “My cools over here, my warms over there; I have sort of families.”

When the paint tubes are pretty much empty, he sends them to “the bin.” Someday, he says, he will pay his nephews to squeeze all of the almost-empty tubes and get one more tube out of the remnants.

Click here to see video of Craig’s explanation.

Another difference, compared to other artists, is that Mooney likes to work at night. Apparently, the witching hour is what gives that touch of magic to a Craig Mooney sky. The irony is not lost that some of the most beautiful skies and light come from a man that prefers to work when its dark.

“The building is quiet at night, and I get in my zone,” says Mooney.  “Most people are home from work and doing other things, and I’m here. The night is a peaceful time. All the thoughts I have accrued throughout the day percolate to the top. It is just a good time for me.”

img_0703

Whatever he is doing is definitely working. Craig had a fabulous summer with us here at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, and we are looking forward to a repeat performance in the Summer of ’17.  Mooney’s solo show at Maine Art Shows starts July 1 and runs through July 20. Until then, please come and see our entire collection in the gallery at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk.  We are open every day from 10 – 5.

To see Craig Mooney’s collection online, click here. Craig Mooney Artist Page

To read more about Mooney and Maine Art, click here. Maine Art and Craig Mooney – Stories and Insights

To share this on your own social media click the icons below.

Recharging His Artist Batteries – William B. Hoyt

10/27/2016 0 Comments
 

d2m1mg5elaprivzszlhg-2

Everyone needs to take time aways from their busy schedule to recharge and rejuvenate.  We all lead such busy lives. With work and family obligations, we often forget how important it is to take care of our own selves. Everyone does this in a different way. Spa time, curling up with a good book, exercise, or being outdoors do it for many. For William B. Hoyt, it is reminding himself that work is also something he loves. Taking time to just paint, especially with other like-minded souls, does wonders for his own.

“This August I found myself in a covey of painters, out on Pemaquid Point on a beautiful day painting plein air. It was workshop for alumni of Julien Merrow-Smith’s, ‘Painting in Provence’,” said Hoyt. “I sort of crashed the party. I came with my friends Hope and Rob. They are actually in the painting, fourth and fifth from the left.”

Hoyt can fly by the seat of his pants like few others.  He embraces the moment and absorbs all he can from each experience that wanders across his path, or in this case an experience he wandered upon.

“I often paint outside but have never done a workshop. I had just mounted a big show for you at Maine Art and had spent months before in my studio. I had been doing mostly larger works,” said Hoyt. “Then this happened. I thought it might be just the thing to recharge my batteries.”

nrje8sk8b0otldmsvqar tvvfljsjyrdqiwruhkqz

It was. The six small studies, two of which are above, were his output during the workshop, showing various scenes out on Pemaquid Peninsula. This larger painting, The Way Life Should Be, was a piece he worked on after the workshop and shows about half of the fifteen artists painting that day.  A painting of painters; that is inspiration.

William B. Hoyt has been with Maine Art for more than thirteen years. We have a continuously growing and changing collection of his work. To view it in its entirety, please visit his Artist Page, William B. Hoyt at Maine Art. To read more about Hoyt and his work with Maine Art, see his featured posts on our Blog Page; Insights and Stories from William B. Hoyt.

Please click the icons below to share this on your own social media pages.

The Growth of an Artist – Philip Frey

10/20/2016 0 Comments
 
From Figurative to Abstract to Landscape and Back Again

axhqcu76jjdzlnw8zm7n

We know and love Philip Frey for his interesting and distinct landscape work. He has a way of looking at Maine and all her beauty with an eye for detail and color. However, his latest work also holds a variety of figurative works and interiors.

“I have a need to explore and discover and stretch my limits as a painter. Cityscapes, abstracts and figuratives are a way for me to do that,” says Frey. “I often wonder how this effects my landscapes. I believe it influences in a positive way. Working with pure abstraction helps me break down what composition could be. In turn, my landscape composition has become more dynamic.”

Stretching as an artist becomes more and more important. Looking for that continued opportunity for growth is how an artist develops.  Philip’s exhibition with The University of Maine Museum of Art is one such opportunity.

“I don’t think I would have done this kind of show in a gallery. Normally, I don’t blend representational and abstract work together. I usually present a more consistent body of work,” says Frey. “This collection is work that has happened over the years. Parallels is about the color, light and movement. These are what bind the work together.”

With over two-hundred people at the opening, Philip was interested to see the reactions from people. The feedback was positive, and Frey actually found it to be fun.

“About a year-and-a-half in the making, I set aside work as I painted for galleries. I pulled pieces out that made sense in this exhibition. The timeline was much longer than a normal gallery show. There was no rush,” says Frey with a smile. “George Kinghorn, the curator of the show, made a few studio visits and helped me to hone in on what made sense.”

Frey’s exhibition, Parallels, at the University of Maine Museum of Art will run through the end of the year. Collectors both old and new will find this display of work both interesting and beautiful.

Like any artist, the ‘what now’ kicks in after the hustle and bustle of putting such a collection together.

“I am headed to London this fall. Museum visits and playing tourist is all that is on the docket for about a week. When I was in college, I went to London and saw the Turners. They had a significant impact,” says Frey. “I am always learning. Other artists’ work that I admire, though not always conscious, comes out in my own.  Brushwork and colors used inspire me.” Philip has a particular interest in The National Gallery and the Beyond Caravaggio exhibit. Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio was a serious influence on Frey in his early life. 

This winter I may go off into a warmer climate. Maybe Colorado will help me find some sunshine,” says Philip. “Normally, winter is filled with studio time during the day. I also love snowshoeing and skiing. I have many friends who all stick around for winter, and we get together on a regular basis.”

Looking at residencies for the future is also on Philip’s mind. “I like to illicit more active feedback from my peers. Having conversations about my work and their work is so important. I did a residency in 2012. It was very fruitful. There are a couple I may apply for next year,” says Frey. “It’s just a place to escape with like-minded people. Though I attend as an individual, I leave with a good cohort of artists and friends.”

yol8656kvjd5fiqj1jrb

Last, but certainly not least on Frey’s to do list, is a piece celebrating our 20th Anniversary, as well as his August show at Maine Art Shows. From August 12 through Labor Day, Philip Frey, Margaret Gerding and Ellen Welch Granter will be having a three-week long show.

“I have already started to think about it. Even though the ideas are not fully formed,” says Philip.  “I am sure there will be a continuation of looking at light more and more closely. I enjoy how it works in my paintings, and I am continually exploring how I can express it in a more dynamic way.”

To read more about Philip Frey and his work at Maine Art Gallery follow this link; Stories and Insights from Philip Frey.  To see his entire collection of work at Maine Art, follow this link; Philip Frey: Artist Page.

Please click the icons below to share this on your own social media.