Intuition Takes Over – Artist Insights from John LeCours

“I had just finished this plein air sketch in an hour. Compared to my studio work that I had spent hours on, it just blew them away. There was no comparison,” says LeCours. “The plein air work had more energy, more vitality. It was more real than the studio work. Because it had come from a three-dimensional world and I was reacting to the elements, even the wind, it had more life. It had all fed into my creativity.”

Discovering the Landscape – Insights from Artist Ingunn Joergensen

“In this show I have explored different landscapes, a subject matter I have not visited in a while,” says Joergensen. “I could not entirely let go of my passion for barns, however. For me, they are more of a shelter or a homestead safely rooted or grounded. They have a sense of belonging to something deeper, and it was important to include them.”

Lucie Boucher and Bernie Huebner – Artists at The Works

All four of us, each a visual artist of one kind or another, saw “it” at the same moment. The potential of glass to be lit from behind by reflection while setting upright in a wood base. Abstracts, representationals, portraits, manipulables, different colors overlapping and creating secondary and tertiary colors, shapes and negative spaces combining to make new shapes and spaces.  

A Little Local Color – Bigbee, Joergensen and LeCours, A Three Artist Show

Capturing and celebrating the colors of Maine is one of the prime desires of a New England artist. It is both a skill and a talent artists Claire Bigbee, Ingunn Joergensen and John LeCours share. This talented trio is featured for three weeks at Shows on Maine Art Hill opening September 1. The artists will attend an opening reception at 10 Chase Hill on Saturday, September 1 from 5 – 7 PM. When three artists together are group together, there needs to be a sense of cohesiveness, a thread that weaves through and connects. For this show, it is color.

Mobile Artist Mark Davis – an interview with M. Sebastian Araujo

Honestly, art is such a subjective thing.  All art is not made for all people.  You should expose yourself to all kinds of art and decide what speaks to you the most fully.  The art historian Kenneth Clark said that when you first lay eyes on a wonderful work of art, it “sings.”   It should be for the love of what you are seeing.

Richard Remsen – Thoughts on Glass

“With all my training, I still need to have that fresh look, that child-like attack or purpose,” Remsen says. “When you see children draw they take off. All children are born artists. The task is to retain some of that natural ability as the techniques become more complex.  I have to strip away all of it and  get back to the childlike approach to being spontaneous.”

Jill Valliere – New Works at The Works

“Layer by layer, I apply metallic paints and glazes of all colors over the metal leaf of gold, bronze or silver. Over and over I add and take away, revealing the beauty beneath by contrast,” shares Valliere.  “I use a Venetian plaster knife or my trusted sander to break through and carve in, exposing underlayers and creating texture and depth.”