Claire Bigbee – A New Artist at The Gallery on Maine Art Hill

03/15/2018 0 Comments

There have been so many new and exciting changes going on in our little corner of Lower Village, Kennebunk, we can hardly stand it.  Along with new buildings and new branding, we have also welcomed a few new artists. One of which is Claire Bigbee.

Bigbee lives and works in Wells and studied graphic design and painting at the Maine College of Art. Even though she is from Massachusetts originally, she quickly found solace in being a local Maine girl.

Bigbee shares, “I moved to Ogunquit at the age of twelve when my parents divorced. I was at an age where I felt really displaced. I wasn’t  connecting to the school system or to the people in school, so I turned to the landscape.”

It was the marshes in Maine that helped ease a lot of her anxieties as a teenager. “I could feel this peace.” Now as an adult, she still finds her place in all Maine has to offer. “The winters are stripped down and everything slows down. I like that solitude. The light is incredible. The blue shadows in the winter and the skies. The beach. The water. The coastline. The pastoral inland views,” Bigbee raves. “The whole state is just a huge canvas waiting to be painted.”

When in the presence of Bigbee’s work there is a sense of energy. While the composition and light may attract her to a scene, it is the free use of color and expression that drives her.

“My process is a response to the atmosphere, the view, and the painting. I am not so concerned about the rendering of the piece,” she shares. “When I’m painting, music keeps my unconscious and conscious connected. As I mix my paints and apply them to my canvas, I’m not necessarily using a formula. I don’t create my palate the same way every time. Sometimes I just apply the paint directly to the canvas.”

It is through music Bigbee finds the soul of the piece she is painting. “When I am working on my floral paintings which are more gestural, I throw the canvas on the floor. I turn up the music and get into the beat of it. It is apparent in the strokes and in the overall energy of these pieces,” she says.

Bigbee is the creative director at Dietz Associates, a certified yoga instructor and has a dance background.   She is a very busy woman. Music helps to tap into her intuition. “Music keeps me on a plane between consciousness and unconsciousness. I’m in a space where I’m responding to the rhythm in notes of the music,” she says referring to dance, “and when painting, to the rhythm in the notes of the paint.”

Bigbee’s work will be debuted in the 7th Annual Choice Show beginning on June 9 at Shows on Maine Art Hill. Gain a sneak peek on May 1 when voting begins.

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Time at the Beach with Alex Dunwoodie

11/30/2017 0 Comments
Time at the Beach with Alex Dunwoodie

Alex Dunwoodie grew up in Buzzard’s Bay, Massachusetts. The sea, the sand, and the shore are where she was raised and are very much a part of who she is. When we first came to know Alex, her paintings were a product of her study of ordinary things collected from this place she loves. She painted small works focused on the treasures found near the shore but placed in collections scattered around her home.  In the last two seasons, she moved her study to the water, and we marveled at the detail and photo-realistic quality of her work. Recently, however, her attention has shifted to focus on the treasures Mother Nature, she herself, collects at the water’s edge.

Rocky Shore 2 by Alex Dunwoodie Rocky Shore 3 by Alex Dunwoodie

Dunwoodie shares, “Painting the shoreline was something I’ve wanted to do for a long time. It was a natural progression from studying the water. Spending time there, I couldn’t help but become interested in the beach rocks gathered where the dry land ends.”

Dunwoodie still spends as much time as she can in Buzzard’s Bay and has been “meaning to” paint these treasures in their natural habitat for some time. They are a stretch for her, as it the larger size canvas she has been working.

“A goal this past year was stepping out of my comfort zone. This included painting larger, and trying some subjects I’ve been contemplating and meaning to get to, especially the beach rocks,” says Alex. “The larger scale allowed me to loosen up, and I can breathe in the spaces working larger. I realize my idea of “larger” is still others’ small works, but for me, these 12 x 12’s, Rocky Shore 2 and Rocky Shore 3, and especially the 20 x 16, Wading, Looking West at Dawn, feel big.”

Wading, Looking West at Dawn by Alex Dunwoodie

For those of us who never leave the beach without a pocket full of glass, shells, and stones, these paintings hold great meaning. “The paintings of rocks are for the people, like me, who spend as much time looking down for treasures as looking out at the water when walking the beach. Simply put, to me, the rocks along the New England shore are fantastic. I just can’t help that they find their way to my home all the time.”

Obviously, time at the beach has had a significant influence on Dunwoodie’s new works.  However, on a side note, she attributes the new work to something else, as well. Something she feels every artist, professional or amateur, can benefit from.

“This past year I spend one day each week volunteering at the RISD Museum,” Alex shares. “It has driven home the immeasurable benefits of spending any time you can with art.”

If you are in the Kennebunks for the holidays and are interested in “spending some time with art,” please stop in and see our wonderful collection of Alex Dunwoodie’s work, and many other artists we are lucky enough to represent. Check our website for our holiday hours.

You can see more of Dunwoodie’s work on her Artist Page, and read more about her “Reverance of Ordinary Things” by clicking here.


John LeCours – An New Artist at Maine Art

10/17/2017 0 Comments

 Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture in Kennebunk is happy to introduce a new artist to the gallery

 John LeCours.

Nederzee Daydream #41

“I have been very fortunate and humbled by my success as an artist, and take none of it for granted,” says LeCours.

LeCours, who works mostly in oils, takes inspiration from the natural beauty of his native New England. “The first time I painted outside, en plein air, in Portsmouth Harbor, I realized that nothing can replace the excitement and energy of reacting to the elements and painting directly,” he says. “Feeling the sights, sounds and smells and reacting to them with ‘mark making’ was a true epiphany.”

Through plein air painting, the intuitive dialogue with the sea and the elements have allowed LeCours to produce his most authentic work and has enabled him to discover his true voice as a visual artist.

 Nederzee Daydream #19

It was three summers ago he visited the Peabody Essex Museum to view a JWM Turner show. “They had many of his works from The Tate Britain and the National Gallery on display for that summer. The show mesmerized me so much that I joined the museum and went to the show about ten times to absorb as much as I could,” recalls LeCours. “Turner was painting “the feel“  of the ocean and the elements. His work certainly was an inspiration.”

“My central aim in painting is to create beautiful imagery. My creative process centers on a direct and intuitive response to nature and its elements in the tradition of JMW Turner and James Abbott MacNeil Whistler,” LeCours explains. “I hope to evoke a response in the viewer to these experiences.”

Harbor Twilight, Cape Porpoise

LeCours grew up in Saratoga Springs, NY. He studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Industrial Design. He currently maintains a loft/studio in his Townhome on the Lamprey River in Epping, NH, but has many collectors outside of New England.

“My paintings have allowed me to form lasting friendships with collectors from across the United States and Canada,” says LeCours.

Join us for an autumn afternoon on Saturday, October 21st. View the new works. Hot apple cider and fall bites will be served. Live music from local guitarist Beau Dalleo.

Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk, is open daily at 10 am. Check the website for closing times as seasons change. FMI call 207-967-2803.

See our complete collection of John LeCours’ work by clicking his link. John LeCours – A Complete Collection

Bethany Harper Williams – A New Artist at Maine Art

10/16/2017 0 Comments

“I am completely inspired by water, sky, and beach, I love the big expanses of landscape. Couple this with the changing ocean light, and it’s magic,” says Bethany Harper Williams.

Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture is happy to introduce a wonderful new artist. We now have the pleasure of representing Bethany Harper Williams.

“I don’t like to paint the obvious. I like the viewer to look and find new things like the shapes of colors, textures, playful shapes and scribbles. The vast areas of sky or beach or water give me the room to play,” says Williams. “When looked at up close, all these interesting and unexpected shapes and subtle textures and colors can be found. Yet from a distance, it is clearly a sky or beach or water.”

Williams often has figures in her paintings. “I am trying to capture a moment in time. I’m not concerned with who the people are, but I’m trying to invoke a memory others can relate to,” shares Williams. “My people have become even more simplified, much less detailed.” In her latest series of Beach Days, the figures are simple strokes of color. But as simple as they are, she still captures the movement and interaction, the mood and activity.

Pink Hat Green Bucket Orange Bucket Blue Boogie Board

“I work mostly with palette knives, big and small. Always using a palette knife for my figures. It helps me to stay away from focussing on details,” says Williams. “Recently I have started to bring brushes back into my work to add texture, but I like using big brushes, like a broom!”

William’s work is often described as having energy but also a calmness and playfulness. “It is reflective of who I am. I am a doer. I’m very active. I love sports, tennis, golf, biking, swimming, and skiing. However, I’m also a very relaxed, calm person. I love to travel, especially adventure traveling.”

One gallery owner says this about Williams and her work. “Her work represents the youthful energy of the present day yet has peaceful and calm roots planted in nostalgia. This paradox is expressed beautifully in her simple yet sophisticated style of painting.”

Big Beach Walk Yellow Bikini Red Trunks

What does Bethany Harper Williams say about her own work? “It makes me happy that I get to do what I love and other people enjoy it too.”

“It makes me happy that I get to do what I love and other people enjoy it too.”

Bethany Harper Williams

Join us for an autumn afternoon on Saturday, October 21st. View the new works. Hot apple cider and fall bites will be served. Live music from local guitarist Beau Dalleo.

  Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk, is open daily at 10 am. Check the website for closing times as seasons change. FMI call 207-967-2803.

See our complete collection of Bethany Harper Williams’ work by clicking her link.

Bethany Harper Williams – A Complete Collection   SaveSave SaveSave

Charles Bluett – A New Artist at Maine Art

06/01/2017 0 Comments

Along the Coast

This is always an exciting time for us here at Maine Art. With so much going on this summer already, it is an added bonus to be able to introduce you to another amazing New England artist, Charles Bluett.

Charles was born in Brussels, Belgium in 1965 where his parents happened to be working at the time. Both his parents are English, however, so they soon moved to the county of Kent, England, where he grew up.

Bluett says, “At 13, we moved again. Westminster, the heart of London, was quite the opposite from Kent’s natural beauty. We lived about 700 meters from Big Ben, the iconic Houses of Parliament and five minutes from the Old Tate gallery, before the New Tate was constructed on the South Bank of the Thames. This is where I first discovered my passion for art, but especially painting. I spent many hours sitting in the Rothko Room there, surround by his ethereal color panels.”

Bluett has spent the best part of his adult life in the US. He didn’t start painting in earnest until he moved to New York City as a young man back in the late 1980’s. Even then, it was purely as a thing he took huge private pleasure from doing; a hobby.

The Little Valley View

“It was a visit from Charlie Phillips who changed all that. Charlie ran an influential gallery in the West End of London with Harry Blain. He came to the house for dinner, saw my work, and offered me my first solo exhibition. This was back in the early 90’s. In the same month, I was also selected by The Royal Academy of Art in Piccadilly, the epicenter of British art for centuries, to feature in the Annual Summer Exhibition. This is where I sold my first work ever commercially. It was a great honor and a humbling experience. I remember taking my dear mother up the hallowed steps of the Royal Academy the day before the opening of the exhibit. We viewed my work in the most prestigious art institution in England. She had always been very supportive of my painting, and this was a definite ‘ah-ha’ moment for me.”

Bluett had a number of solo exhibitions in London and the US, but it was not until January of 2016, that life finally showed him that he must do this full time.

“Life is simply too short not to follow your passion. My wife had fallen ill with cancer, and after we were blessed to come through the other side, I decided it was time to stop compromising and use the gift I had been given to its fullest.”

For Bluett, this decision stays with him daily. After he spends what he considers a highly productive day completing a piece of work, he leaves his studio for the day walking backwards. He stares at the final piece through his studio door windows and contemplates.

“I am always still considering whether it is complete or not. Then, I turn toward the outdoor view ahead of me and see a twilight sky, a blazon sunset or simple tree line, and I am filled with so much color and energy. I smile to myself, realizing I should never take myself that seriously. In all I do, given what is laid out before me by ‘the powers that be’ in such scale and natural wonder, I keep perspective. I always try hard to be a part of it all. It is the important message I am left with, and I enjoy and relish the gifts I have been given, whatever they may be. This always makes me smile. Thankfully, it happens very often.”


Bluett currently resides in Vermont with his lovely and hugely understanding wife, Suzy, his two kids, Ty and India, and a large number of critters, from horses to cats and dogs.

Be on the lookout for more posts about Charles Bluett, his inspirations and his process. His work is like no other in our gallery and certainly is worth a peek in person. We are open every day, but please check our website for hours.

**If you can’t make it to the Kennebunks soon, check out our complete collection of his work on his artist page. Charles Bluett – Artist Page.

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Elizabeth Ostrander – Artist Insights

01/12/2017 2 Comments

Elizabeth Ostrander

Elizabeth Ostrander has not forgotten her “inner woman”.  She celebrates her with clay and a glaze of acrylic paint to make her come alive in so many of her sculptures. “The mystical and the mythical, the search for understanding and harmony, the conscious creation of self and community are essential parts of my female life and experience,” says Ostrander. “Female images in my sculptures reflect not only my own experiences as a woman, but also synchronicities beyond myself.” She believes in the power of this connection. It is a balance and a love, along with an understanding of the body as an expressive agent. This originated in her teens while a student of classical ballet in New York. “I found through dancing that our bodies are places of knowledge and revelation. Early in my childhood until my late teens I studied ballet and experienced my body’s emotional expression through movement. Today, I still love to dance. I enlighten my sculpting-self with my dancing-self by posing my own body in the position I want to sculpt,” says Ostrander. “I want to feel my sculpture both physically and emotionally from the inside out. Some artists find this through music, but it is the physicality of dance that becomes the physicality of my sculptures.” Nature, especially in Maine, also gives her enduring inspiration. In 1971, Elizabeth moved from New York to the coast of Maine, a move that holds no regret.
“Rural Maine has been my home since I moved from New York City, heeding the call of the then popular back-to-the-land movement. Like many others, I was filled with the idealism of the time, and wanted to live a self-directed life, close to Nature,” says Elizabeth. “I am still grateful for my unique and uprooted New York City childhood, and Eastport has its own distinctive history of artists finding their way to its beautiful shores. My Eastport colleagues and I continue that tradition.”
Grateful for her ability to continue the unfolding adventure of pursuing her work as an artist, Elizabeth celebrates being able to create what she needs. “The impulse to create is ancient.  I feel goosebumps when I picture that somewhere back in the days of early humans, someone reached down and pulled up a handful of mud and started shaping it – and something arose in this artist’s hands and mind that had never existed before. I like feeling I’m a part of this continuum. This passion to create has been my unfolding adventure in life.”


Elizabeth has a wonderful collection of sculpture at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture in Kennebunk. She is always bringing in new work, and we encourage you to visit, as well check out her Artist Page on our website. Our January hours are Friday – Sunday, from 10-5.  Please feel free to call with any questions 207- 967-2803.

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Trip Park – Artist Insights

01/05/2017 1 Comment

Trip Park

Born in upstate New York – really, really far upstate New York – Trip Park “started” in the world of art by drawing. Not knowing where it would eventually lead, he took every opportunity to put pencil to paper. He didn’t just love to draw, he felt he had to draw – every and any place he could.

“For me, drawing was a zip-line to staying focused. I drew through high school and college,” says Park. “I created editorial cartoons at UNC, which was fun. Perhaps I had a never-diagnosed-case-of-ADD. If so, drawing was my natural Ritalin.”

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he majored in Journalism, but drawing lead him to advertising classes. A career in advertising, as an art director, soon followed. It wasn’t until five jobs later – an illustrator, a children’s book illustrator, an editorial cartoonist and an animation character designer – that he began painting.

“Let’s be clear. I never, ever wanted to paint!” laughs Park. “I painted with watercolor and gouache when I began illustrating, and I will never forget how messy it was. There was paint everywhere. Later, I illustrated children’s books on the computer. The drawing programs were so clean and simple. I loved the fact that there was no mess.”

It wasn’t until his wife decided to paint and sold her work first that the idea of painting became reality. Trip claims he was shamed into paint. Little did he know, after a few years of painting, he would finally turn himself over to “the mess.”

“I’m a pig-n-slop-slobby. There is paint everywhere in my studio. It is on me, on my clothes, in my hair,” Park says with a sigh. “I miss drawing on the computer.”

Trip works best in his studio, but owns the fact that it’s a complete chaos of art in progress. Paint truly is everywhere. With this, he knows it’s best to stay put. His studio is his creative space.

“It’s good I stay inside. People would be highly offended if I flung paint at them in public,” says Park. “Also, I’m a hoarder of many paints and need the routine of all of them surrounding my canvas. I don’t just want my studio, I need it.”

Amongst the artist clutter, there is  little about Trip’s process that stays consistent. It is a place he can explore and experiment. It’s always changing. He started with brushes, then for a while only used palette knives, and now he is back to brushes. The only constant; he must love what he creates.

“It stings a little each time one of my paintings leaves the studio; I really want to love each one before I let it go,” says Park. “I owe that to anyone who purchases one of my paintings. If I’m not happy with them, how should I expect anyone else to be?”

In this regard, Park is relentless. He doesn’t give up until he feels the work is his best. He admits to not meeting his own expectations sometimes, but the continued push is what makes his work great.

“I never quite get a piece exactly like I had hoped, but in the words of artist, Ralph Steadman, ‘Anything could be there (on the canvas)… I don’t go out of my way to be professional, I go out of my way to try and make something that is as unexpected to me as anyone else.’  This quote gives me solace,” says Park, “and I continue to paint.”

An example of a new thought process for me. These are parts of the campuses that I step on for months on end, then I have a thought...?

Trip Park has been with Maine Art for over two years now. We are lucky to have a fabulous collection of his work in the gallery at 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk. We welcome you to come visit and see it in person, but know it is also available to view online at

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A Different Kind of Boat Builder – David Riley Peterson

11/18/2016 0 Comments


The birth of David Riley Peterson’s boats was an interesting one. To say ‘one thing lead to another’ is an understatement, but it is still the best way to describe his ‘AH-HA’ moment.

Riley explains, “I was asked to make an olive tray for a local gift shop. Not seeing much challenge in it, I procrastinated until the third request. I returned to my studio and, reluctantly, rolled out a small thin slab of clay and folded it into a simple tray and joined the ends. It was a waste of my awesome talent.” Staring at it in dismay and disgust the little pod transformed. “I held it in my hands, and the ‘AH-HA’ moment occurred. The clay spoke and in a meek, shy voice it said, ‘I want to be a boat.’ Ever since that moment, I am a devoted (clay) boat builder,” laughs Peterson.


His past and present blend a love of boats with playing in the mud. He is the first to admit that clay just suits his personality. Born in Beverly, Massachusetts, he was always reprimanded for playing in every mud puddle he could find. Growing up, there were no art classes, let alone ceramics, offered in school.

“I was clueless about clay until I went off to college. My dorm at the University of Florida was located across the street from the ceramics department. I was always curious about the group of students who entered and left the building dressed in dirty jeans or tattered shorts with every body part covered in clay; so I investigated,” says Peterson. “What I discovered instantly changed my life, and I could hardly wait until the next semester to enroll in my first ceramics class; ‘Introduction to Clay.’ I was not disappointed.”

Peterson went on to graduate with a BFA in Ceramics/Sculpture, own his own studio and teach. Since 1984, he has also been the President of Peterson Marine Surveys. Two careers that appear to be quite different, Peterson effectively merges into one life.

Peterson’s father was originally from Maine, and the family often came north during the summer. He remembers spending that time playing with boats. “Maine is a real fishing community. They used dories for fishing and pulling nets in, and stuff like that, but mostly lobstering. These boats were iconic watercraft years ago.” It wasn’t a stretch to add Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture to Peterson’s list of galleries.  His boats fit perfectly between images of seascapes and rocky coasts. The life-like quality he brings to his clay captures locals and tourists alike, and are a beautiful reminder of life in Maine.


Come and see David Riley Peterson’s work in person at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk, Maine. We are open year-round. You can also view his work on our website at his Artist Page, David Riley Peterson at Maine Art. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call. 207-967-2803

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Margaret Gerding – New at Maine Art

08/31/2016 0 Comments

Gerding_Patterns in Nature

A once ‘plein air only’ painter, Gerding’s oils embody the natural landscapes of coastal Maine. Her realistic interpretation of these unspoiled settings reflect a single moment in time. Her warm palette and textured brushwork, for which she is known, capture subtle changes of light and fleeting moments of color.

Gerding says, “Each piece is based on a real place, a moment I have experienced and been inspired by. There is something about being alone with nature—a quiet that connects me like no other. It is only this solitude, whether outside or in the studio, that allows the landscape to reveal itself to me.”

Plein air painting is how Margaret began, and it is still very much a part of her process. But with the birth of her daughter, the need for studio time became necessary and changes began. Now she has the best of both worlds. Her plein air painting keeps her work loose, while her studio time allows her to refine her art to a more finished state.

“My studio gives me more time to examine my work. It’s more intellectual, and the final pieces are polished. When I work en plein air, it is fast and intuitive and exploratory,” says Gerding. “Now, with both spaces as part of my process, I have the time to develop a piece and push my understanding of atmosphere and abstract simplifications in the landscape.”

In the recent months, it is not uncommon to find her along the Kennebunk Bridle Path sketching the marsh grasses or wetland waterways. With her recent move to Cape Porpoise, she is spending more and more time surrounded by the beauty of the area. “I no longer have to travel but am immersed daily in the area of my greatest inspiration. It is a place where nature provides a lifetime of exploration and study.  I had the good fortune of vacationing here every summer as a child. I grew up wandering in the marshes, exploring the greenness and the vast skies. It was a puzzle to traverse the waterways, an escape,” says Gerding. “Now, it’s home.”

With her move, she was also looking for local representation. With galleries throughout CT and MA, including Boston , she still wanted something close to home. John Spain, owner of Maine Art says, “As with many artists, it was important to Margaret to find a local gallery. She was looking for an audience who has an understanding of her subject matter and her story. We are thrilled she found it with us. In a way, this isn’t a show opening, but more of a welcome to the neighborhood.”

Gerding, a graduate from UMass, Dartmouth, had her first major show at the age of twenty-five on Newbury Street in Boston. Her early success and continued hard work lead to her paintings being included in the book, 100 Artists of New England by E. Ashley Rooney and New England Paintings (14th ed.), published by The Open Press.  Many private and corporate collections also contain her work, including L.L. Bean in Freeport, Maine Medical Center in Portland, Fidelity Investments in Boston and the Westin Hotel in Boston.

Margaret Gerding

This show of new works opens Saturday, September 3 and continues through September 22. There will be an Artist’s Reception from 5 to 7 pm on opening night. Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture is located at 14 Western Ave and is open everyday from 10 AM to 6PM. The show can be viewed online beginning Wednesday, August 31 at FMI call 207-967-2803.

To see all of Margaret’s work visit her Artist Page. Margaret Gerding – Artist Page

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James “Riv” Pyne – A Sculptor

05/12/2016 0 Comments

James Rivington Pyne is a Mainer. Maybe not born and raised, but he certainly has done his time.  He is a life-long summer resident who just couldn’t stay away.  In 1983, he moved here permanently, and now is happy to call it home. There is just something about this state that captures a heart and soul and refuses to let go.

“Riv” feels the same way about the subject of many of his sculptures, birds.  “I could be cynical enough to say my love of birds began when they started making money for me,” Pyne says with a smile. “But before that–in fact when I was 15 or so–I came to the realization that birds, even condors, turkeys, and vultures, are the most beautiful creatures on this earth.”

Pyne’s sculptures, especially his birds, have a unique and interesting feel, both literally and figuratively.  The use of mixed media and composite gives a rough and real texture to the pieces he creates. The wings of his birds are life-like and natural, encouraging the admirer to reach out and touch them.  “In the spring when the sap is running, I put split-in -half poplar logs into a vice, chisel a couple of inches into the wood, get my hand around the cut piece and rip it off the far end of the log. The results are bird wings, fish fins, and a number of other things,” explains Pyne. This technique is seen in the tail feathers of this Pair of Whimbrels.


Figuratively,his work captures a personality that may normally not come through in the physical characteristics of his subjects. “My work is stylized, but the subject is never unrecognizable,” says Pyne.  “I find that the best way to express a bird’s edginess on a limb or briskness in flight is by rough, almost blurred outlines, similar to a sketch, rather than smooth finishes.”  Even his bronze work has a texture that catches the eye and the imagination.  The surface of the Bronze Greyhound has a dimension which not only captures his character, it makes him real.



Recently, Riv delivered a wonderful sculpture of a flock of Kingfishers. They are crafted with care and detail, and urge the viewer to move closer to take them all in. The title of this piece is Set of 8 Kingfishers. What makes it curious? There are only seven.  “I’m assuming the eighth one is in flight,” says Natalie Lane, the gallery manager. Maybe that is what they are all looking at. This piece is only five inches tall, but they are perched on a platform that is almost two feet wide.  There is a window sill out there that is just perfect for this work.


Pyne has been a part of Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture since 2012, and we have quite an extensive collection of his work. This new work has such personality and charm, it truly is meant to be seen in person. Of course, his work is also available to view online by visiting his Artist Page.

To read more blogs about Pyne and his work with Maine Art Click Here.