Lucie Boucher and Bernie Huebner – Artists at The Works

All four of us, each a visual artist of one kind or another, saw “it” at the same moment. The potential of glass to be lit from behind by reflection while setting upright in a wood base. Abstracts, representationals, portraits, manipulables, different colors overlapping and creating secondary and tertiary colors, shapes and negative spaces combining to make new shapes and spaces.  

Ingunn Joergensen – A New Artist at The Gallery on Maine Art Hill

The beauty of the Maine landscape, the constantly changing elements, and the ocean are a never-ending source of inspiration for all of Joergensen’s art and design work. “It is the little things that catch my attention, a piece, a fragment, a texture, a thought, a word. Sometimes taking it all in is so much, it is almost overwhelming,” Ingunn shares. “One little shell tells the story of the ocean. A piece of wood tells the story of lived life. Beauty is found in the most unexpected places.”

Time at the Beach with Alex Dunwoodie

“A goal this past year was stepping out of my comfort zone. This included painting larger, and trying some subjects I’ve been contemplating and meaning to get to, especially the beach rocks,” says Alex. “The larger scale allowed me to loosen up, and I can breathe in the spaces working larger. I realize my idea of “larger” is still others’ small works, but for me, these 12 x 12s and especially the 20 x 16 feels big.”

John LeCours – An New Artist at Maine Art

LeCours, who works mostly in oils, takes inspiration from the natural beauty of his native New England. “The first time I painted outside, en plein air, in Portsmouth Harbor, I realized that nothing can replace the excitement and energy of reacting to the elements and painting directly,” he says. “Feeling the sights, sounds and smells and reacting to them with ‘mark making’ was a true epiphany.”

Bethany Harper Williams – A New Artist at Maine Art

“I don’t like to paint the obvious. I like the viewer to look and find new things like the shapes of colors, textures, playful shapes and scribbles. The vast areas of sky or beach or water give me the room to play,” says Williams. “When looked at up close, all these interesting and unexpected shapes and subtle textures and colors can be found. Yet from a distance, it is clearly a sky or beach or water.”

Elizabeth Ostrander – Artist Insights

Elizabeth Ostrander has not forgotten her “inner woman”. She celebrates her with clay and a glaze of acrylic paint to make her come alive in so many of her sculptures. “The mystical and the mythical is an essential part of my female life and experience,” says Ostrander. “Female images in my sculptures reflect not only my own experiences as a woman, but also synchronies beyond myself.”