Marta Spendowska – A New Artist at The Works on Maine Art Hill

“I work with water-based materials because they are immediately responsive. They remind me that life does not allow for ‘do-overs’,” she shares.  “The only certain thing is here, now.” The fluidity of her materials allows Marta to be spontaneous and curious which is essential to crafting a painting or series of paintings. “There is nothing better than a drop of water with paint merging into it,” shares Marta.

Getting to Know Artist, Bethany Harper Williams

Williams often has figures in her paintings. “I am trying to capture a moment in time. I’m not concerned with who the people are, but I’m trying to invoke a memory others can relate to,” shares Williams. “My people have become even more simplified, much less detailed.” In her latest series of Beach Days, the figures are simple strokes of color. But as simple as they are, she still captures the movement and interaction, the mood and activity.

Ingunn Joergensen – A New Artist at The Gallery on Maine Art Hill

The beauty of the Maine landscape, the constantly changing elements, and the ocean are a never-ending source of inspiration for all of Joergensen’s art and design work. “It is the little things that catch my attention, a piece, a fragment, a texture, a thought, a word. Sometimes taking it all in is so much, it is almost overwhelming,” Ingunn shares. “One little shell tells the story of the ocean. A piece of wood tells the story of lived life. Beauty is found in the most unexpected places.”

Artist Kathy Ostrander Roberts

My goal is to represent the essence of Maine coastal waters in encaustic painting, by capturing scenes from the coastline of Southern Maine and translating them into vibrant representations of movement and color.  Through layering and sculpting of the medium, I create depth and intrigue. My hope is to spark memories and longings for Maine’s rugged shores in the hearts and eyes of the viewer.

Time at the Beach with Alex Dunwoodie

“A goal this past year was stepping out of my comfort zone. This included painting larger, and trying some subjects I’ve been contemplating and meaning to get to, especially the beach rocks,” says Alex. “The larger scale allowed me to loosen up, and I can breathe in the spaces working larger. I realize my idea of “larger” is still others’ small works, but for me, these 12 x 12s and especially the 20 x 16 feels big.”