Witbeck and Williams Take Two – Back By Popular Demand

When something works…

celebrate it again.

That is exactly what we are doing from July 24 to August 12 with artists Bethany Harper Williams and David Witbeck. Starting at 10 AM Saturday, July 24, this dynamic duo fills the walls at 10 Chase Hill Road in Kennebunk.

“In 2018, we showcased the talented pair with great success,” shares gallery owner John Spain. “Both Witbeck and Williams exemplify summer in paint. This season of sunshine is the perfect opportunity to do it again with their fun and colorful works.”

From the larger-than-life fisherman and lobsterman to his classic coastal scenes, David Witbeck does not disappoint. His varied content and color palettes this season are an excellent addition to his traditional collections.

“All my work is essentially big shapes based ever so loosely on reality,” says David Witbeck. “Regardless of what the nominal subject matter of my work may appear to be, to me, my oil paintings are about making interesting shapes and composing the surface of the canvas in a pleasing way.”

Likewise, Bethany Harper Williams uses small shapes to create her scenes of summer. Each small brush stroke is coupled with a collection of marks.  The expanse of canvas allows Williams to play with texture, shape, and color, abstracting the elements but using figures or boats to put everything into context. Her addition of geometric patterns in her oil paint, however, often spark questions.

“I continue to abstract the details. I take the viewer away from the specifics of who and where and allow the image to evoke a personal memory. Therefore the painting resonates with each individual viewer,” says Williams. “The large spaces of water and sky are filled with patches of color accented with different textures, patterns, and whimsical marks. I like creating the unexpected. Adding little circles or squares serves as a reminder that it is not a photograph, but inspiration from a moment in time.”

Starting on Saturday, July 24, at 10 AM, the gallery at 10 Chase Hill welcomes the public to view and purchase these stunning celebrations of color and summer.  Both artists will be at Shows on Saturday evening from 5 – 7 PM. They each are excited to share their process, inspiration, and new works. The Artist Reception is a free event.

Again, the show is running until Thursday, August 12th. This gallery is open every day from 10 am to 5 pm.  Plan to stop into our other three locations. The Gallery at 14 Western Ave, The Grand Hotel Gallery at 1 Chase Hill, and Studios at 5 Chase Hill. All are open during the Artist Reception and every day this summer. Open daily at 10 am. Check the website for summer hours. FMI www.maine-art.com

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, July 21. Virtual Tour available on the evening of Friday, July 23.

To see our complete collection of both artists’ works, click below

David Witbeck  –  Artist Page

Bethany Harper Williams – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of each artist, click below.

David Witbeck – Insights and Stories

Bethany Harper Williams – Insights and Stories

It’s All About Perspective – Insights from Artist Bethany Harper Williams

Over the last year, so many spent time doing, seeing, creating, and finding what makes us happy. This was especially true for artist Bethany Harper Williams.

“This past year affected all of us in so many different ways. We were forced to spend more time isolated from family and friends. It made me realize how fortunate I am to have something to do that I am so passionate about,” explains Williams. “I had endless time to focus on my painting. It gave me time to explore and look at things from new perspectives.”

 

At times, materials and canvasses were hard to come by, so Williams sometimes took old paintings and brought new life to them, creating new works with incredible layers of textures and colors below.

“Many of these paintings with large patches of color are abstracts, but with a glimpse of reality,” she tells. “I enjoyed playing with the contrast of abstract and more representative.

For Williams, the large shapes evoke the feel and mood of the landscape, be it beach or water or sky, without being representational. Then one patch reveals a more representational view, an unexpected view, like Take Me to the Beach.

“While playing with patterns – polka dots, lines, circles… things became playful and whimsical. I was not focussed on representing the reality,” Williams shares. ‘Instead, they create a joyful mood that keeps the viewer involved, looking, questioning.”

This was also a year of staying at home for Bethany.

“I couldn’t get to Maine as often as I usually would. So, I couldn’t get my fill of beach and ocean. I missed the colors and the sounds, but I was able to escape there in my paintings,” says Williams. “It made me appreciate how I need, truly need, this escape to the ocean.”

It also made her realize how art can be an escape for others. By taking people to special places and then giving them the ability to bring these same places back into their homes.

“I’m so appreciative and humbled that my work can provide that joy to others.”

ABOUT THE 2021 SHOW

Starting on Saturday, July 24, at 10 AM, the gallery at 10 Chase Hill welcomes the public to view and purchase these stunning celebrations of color and summer.  Both Bethany Harper Williams and David Witbeck will be at Shows on Saturday evening from 5 – 7 PM. They each are excited to share their process, inspiration, and new works. The Artist Reception is a free event.

Again, the show is running until Thursday, August 12th. This gallery is open every day from 10 am to 5 pm.  Plan to stop into our other three locations. The Gallery at 14 Western Ave, The Grand Hotel Gallery at 1 Chase Hill, and Studios at 5 Chase Hill. All are open during the Artist Reception and every day this summer. Open daily at 10 am. Check the website for summer hours. FMI www.maine-art.com

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, July 21. Virtual Tour available on the evening of Friday, July 23.

To see our complete collection of Bethany’s  works, click below

Bethany Harper Williams – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of Bethany, click below.

Bethany Harper Williams – Insights and Stories

Scenes from a Fisherman – Artist Insights from David Witbeck

“Over the most recent months, my studio has been a perfect retreat. I work alone most days, and it is tranquil. Not lonely, but alone. It is an artist’s sanctuary,” shares Witbeck. “The season had a strange beginning. However, due to the pandemic, I was able to take some time to try a few new things. The interesting part, I had a lot of missteps. I did a great deal of ‘unpainting.’ Of course, productivity changed because of this. Still, I am excited about the results. It is a very cohesive show that still has various subjects, sizes, and surprises.”

Witbeck has been kind enough to share some of the stories and inspiration behind a few of the pieces he created for this 2021 summer show.  We are so happy to share his insights with you.

“When revisiting some paintings I loved from a few years ago, I created the Fresh Series. Ironic how things happen,” shares Witbeck. “Fresh Paint, Fresh Caught, and Fresh Bait are foreground-focused and meant to show pieces of the process a fisherman must take care of that the rest of us often don’t even think about.”

When you have been painting fish for as long as David has, you understand the need to find the perfect way to make them come to life. He has done it!

“I have been working on a glaze for my fish,” shares Witbeck. “I wipe on translucent layers of color on their scales, and the effect has finally captured the true beauty of these creatures.”

When two is better than one.

“I have painted a few ‘fishercouples’ before. If traced back, the origins come from an old picture of my wife and me. Clarence and Clara Clamming is an obvious part of this series.”

Celebrating the coast has long been a favorite pastime for Witbeck. Here are a few insights that truly give a peek inside of the workings behind the brush. “To me, Bustling Harbor has a fresh feel even though it is an incredibly complex painting. Like many harbors, it has a tremendous amount of activity and is packed full of incredible detail.”

If you look closely at Bustling Harbor, you will find the fisherman from Low Tide at Dawn. What is one of the multitudes of tiny details in a busy harbor,  he turned into one of few peaceful moments in a fisherman’s morning.

‘Cloudscapes’ aren’t something Witbeck ever focused too much time on. Yet, like everything else, that has changed. Into the Light is one of those pieces where the clouds became the central focus of the piece. “I spent time working on the boat wake, motoring into the sunrise,” he says.  “It is a detail that needed to be added, but I was surprised at the difficulty of such a simple thing. It is a rarity that I paint a ‘pretty painting.’ With the brilliant yellow and the purple clouds, this one is indeed pretty.”

When David and his wife, Barbara, are in Owls Head, the misted ridge islands are often shrouded in fog. It can be eery. The mist gives a softer look in pieces like Low Tide at Dawn (above), Semi-Retired, and Morning Fog. “I don’t love it when I’m on vacation, but the aura of mystery it provides to my painting is beautiful.”

One never knows where inspiration will come from, a piece of real life, a memory, a color, a moment. “Bud’s Bucket of Fish reminds me in a distant way of Andrew Wyeth,” explains Witbeck. “He celebrated the fishermen and their dories but in a way very different from my own. Still, we certainly share the same sense of respect for this demanding career.”

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, July 21. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, July 23.

To see our complete collection of this Witbeck’s works, click below

David Witbeck  –  Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of Witbeck, click below.

David Witbeck – Insights and Stories

It’s Where You Look and How You See – Artist Insights from Bethany Harper Williams

There are five words artist Bethany Harper Williams uses when describing her 2021 show with us. Perspective. Color. Patterns. Exploring. Mood. 

Each of these words is not singular but more all-encompassing. She kept these five ideas close to her mind, her heart, and her brush during the creation of this spectacular collection.

“There are few things I tried to focus on as I worked on this show. I became much more aware of ‘from where’ and ‘how’ I looked at things. I found myself studying the same things from a different angle,” shares Bethany.  “ A great deal of the time, I tried to look beyond or past or through. Whether it was ordinary objects, house, people, or even shapes.”

When going beyond what is expected, she keeps the viewer intrigued, finding more, and questioning. With Williams and this show, it was more about seeing more and looking closer.

“I played with patterns for this show.  Polka dots, lines, circles… It is meant to be playful and whimsical, not focussed on representing reality, but creating a joyful mood,” explains Williams. “This keeps the viewer involved, looking, questioning.”

“There seems to be a theme of windows to another view – some literally showing the window frame. I never like giving the whole story,” shares Williams, “I always like the viewer to be involved in completing his or her own story.”

 

Some paintings in this show are moodier and less busy. She was more focused on the quiet moment. In this case, the looking and the seeing turned in.

“I did a lot of yoga this past year, and there are many pieces about being in the moment,” shares Williams. “I wanted to capture moments of reflection, peace, calm, and beauty.”

ABOUT THE 2021 SHOW

Starting on Saturday, July 24, at 10 AM, the gallery at 10 Chase Hill welcomes the public to view and purchase these stunning celebrations of color and summer.  Both Bethany Harper Williams and David Witbeck will be at Shows on Saturday evening from 5 – 7 PM. They each are excited to share their process, inspiration, and new works. The Artist Reception is a free event.

Again, the show is running until Thursday, August 12th. This gallery is open every day from 10 am to 5 pm.  Plan to stop into our other three locations. The Gallery at 14 Western Ave, The Grand Hotel Gallery at 1 Chase Hill, and Studios at 5 Chase Hill. All are open during the Artist Reception and every day this summer. Open daily at 10 am. Check the website for summer hours. FMI www.maine-art.com

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, July 21. Virtual Tour available on the evening of Friday, July 23.

To see our complete collection of Bethany’s  works, click below

Bethany Harper Williams – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of Bethany, click below.

Bethany Harper Williams – Insights and Stories

The Boys are Back in Town – Artist Insights from David Witbeck

Witbeck’s Boys of Summer Revisited for 2021 (Some stories never get old.)

Mort, Theo, Erik, Bryce, Mac, and Winston. They work the local docks. They are Mainers, born and raised. They are coastal life personified. They are the iconic fisherman of David Witbeck.

Through the years we have become quite familiar with Witbeck’s fishermen. Still, questions remain. Where did they come from? And more importantly, how did they find their way into Witbeck’s studio? Lucky for us, Witbeck is not only an artist but a storyteller.

As a freelance photographer, he used to love to go out on commercial fishing vessels when he had free time. Often, he toyed with the idea of doing an extended photo essay, but he could never justify the amount of time away from ‘paying jobs.’ “Truth be told, I usually had more fun talking with the crews and helping to sort fish than taking pictures,” says Witbeck, thinking back on the memory.

When he later started painting, fishing seemed to be the natural subject matter for him. “I wanted my paintings to be iconic rather than descriptive. For descriptive focus, photography would have been a better way to do it. I wanted to paint.” Initially, it was just for the fun of it, but then one morning about ten years ago, just before waking up, he found his inspiration.

“I had had one of those wonderful little REM sleep dreams. A guy was holding a fish. There just happened to be a sketchbook on the floor beside the bed, and I made this little ten-second doodle,” laughs Witbeck. “The rest is history.”

FMDoodle copy-1

They have certainly come a long way.

And so goes the story of how these boys and more came to spend the summer on Maine Art Hill.

A David Witbeck Side Note –

“I also made another doodle, tentatively called, ‘The Last Fish.’ Yet, after ten years, and more than 300 fisherman paintings, I haven’t quite got to it yet.” For a few reasons we, as loyal Witbeck fans, hope the last fish never comes.

thelastfish copy-1

 

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, July 21. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, July 23.

To see our complete collection of this Witbeck’s works, click below

David Witbeck  –  Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of Witbeck, click below.

David Witbeck – Insights and Stories

Three Artist Pop-Up with Lauren Beach, Kelly Ufkin, and Nina Devenney

 

Featured Artists

Lauren Beach, Kelly Ufkin, and NinaDevenney

The guest artist for Pop-Up 

Thursday, July 22 to Wednesday, July 28

Read on to learn more about their inspiration, their process, and their work.

 

Wild Rosie  – Maine artist, Nina Devenney

Wild Rosie is the creation of Maine artist Nina Devenney, who resides in midcoast Maine and works from a cozy home studio nestled against the woods and just a few miles from the sea. She was raised by ceramic artists, whose work and artistic visions were a constant in her childhood home. Above all, being raised by artists taught her to notice, appreciate deeply, and find joy in the tiniest of moments. 

Nina has been making art with her own two hands for as long as she can remember. With a background that covers a breadth of media, she has found herself continually inspired by the earth and revels in the endless wonder of Maine’s land and coastline. 

Wild Rosie was born out of a sincere love of the natural world and a true desire to bring beauty and a genuine joy to the lives of others. Environmental conservation is often at the heart of her work, with a deep love of all the exquisite beauty the earth gives to those that call it home. She is constantly driven by a strong desire to bring our world closer together and to encourage others to look upon the world with a sense of wonder and awe. In seeing the natural riches that we all share and have in common, she hopes to inspire the viewer to take good care of the place we all call home. 

You can visit Wild Rosie at www.wildrosiemaine.com and follow along on Instagram   @wildrosie.maine

Kelly Ufkin

My paintings have taken on a more personal significance as I explore content that has importance to me, moving beyond the figure and still lifes. I am striving to obtain composition, balance, and color relations while experimenting with textures. Even though my intuitive responses occasionally stray from color accuracy, I want to maintain precision with perspective and proportion. I have realized that I am not a narrative artist but would like my viewers to experience a sense of escape.

My work has taken on new directions through the inspiration and study of artists that have impacted me, especially from the Impressionist era. Monet, Renoir, and Corot have enlightened me on how to really capture a moment in time in a simplistic manner. They give just enough indication and detail to portray a mood. Caravaggio and Artemisia Gentileschi’s realism and extensive technique have helped me enhance my style and progress as an artist. Modern painters such as the Wyeth family have provided me with motivation and insight.

My more recent paintings contain elevated complexities with composition, lighting, and contrast. The main focus is the distortion of images within water that converses with the concrete physicality of its surroundings. Rather than being inclusive of the standard formula of distribution between sky and land, I prefer to mostly deny the sky to allow water to be the primary element.

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Lauren Beach

Lauren Beach (Mt Desert, ME) creates jewelry in wood and metal in her home-based studio. A bone carving and inlay apprenticeship in New Zealand in 2010 was the catalyst for pursuing a studio practice. In the last two years, she has taught herself additional woodworking and lapidary skills.

“Working with a jeweler-mentor who has experience with wood and metal and can help me find creative ways to connect them is essential to my growth. I feel as though I am on the brink of being able to move towards making my studio practice a full-time career, and I feel this opportunity will help me make the jump.” – Lauren Beach.

 

 

  

Pop-Up with Artist Eric Howell

 

Featured Artist Eric Howell is the guest artist for Pop-Up beginning Thursday, July 8 to Wednesday, July 21. Read on to learn more about his inspiration, his process, and his work.

July 8 to July 21

self-taught.

i cling tight to the notion we each contain the untapped multiverse.

i’m simply trying to capture as vivid a shadow of such as possible.

 

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Three Artists One Show – Bigbee, Bruson and Kohler in 2021

“If I could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint.” –  Edward Hopper.

Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk describes summer in New England perfectly, but not in words, in paint.   This three artist show features the works of painters Claire Bigbee, Ryan Kohler, and Karen Bruson. It will run for three weeks, beginning July 3 at 10 AM. There is an opening artist reception, Saturday, August 12, from 5 to 7 PM. This is a wonderful time to meet the artists and enjoy these incredible works.

 “When putting a show together, we want the artist to compliment, but not compete with each other,” says gallery owner John Spain.  “Each of these three artists has distinctively different styles and subjects, but the show as a whole is a wonderfully cohesive body of work.”

With a talent for using oil and acrylic in her work, artist Claire Bigbee shares her love of Maine. A bit of a local celeb, she sees the familiar landscapes around her and recreates her vision in her own distinct and beautiful way. 

“My process is a response to the atmosphere, the view, and the painting. I am not so concerned about the rendering of the piece,” says Bigbee. “It is something behind the view that drives me to return to nature. The river and marsh have always struck me. There is something in the wind, like a warm breath. It moves through the tall marsh grasses, and the birds swoon in flocks, not missing a beat. The sky is so vast, and pregnant clouds shadow the marsh and river.  It is breathtaking and mysterious and leaves me wordless.”

The second artist is Artist Karen Bruson. She is relatively new to Maine Art Hill but not to the art world. After receiving her Bachelor of Fine Arts, she spent several years as an illustrator and graphic designer for New Hampshire Magazine. She then continued her creative exploration by becoming a Daily Painter and administrator of a Daily Painting website, Fresh Paint Daily Painters. 

“My artwork comes from the visual connection I have with common, everyday objects and places. I am inspired by the way light falls upon a subject, casting rich dark shadows, and I aspire to simplify the nuances within those darks,” explains Bruson. “Painting for me is a life-long journey of observations and a representational translation of my surroundings.”

Artist Ryan Kohler completes this dynamic trio for Maine Art Hill. A true Maine boy, Kolher paints, and tapes and scrapes, his canvases with the wonders of this crazy beautiful state. Looking at flora and fauna as well as buildings and boats, Kohler embraces his process and finds beauty in what many overlook. 

“My process is evolving a little bit. The main meat and potatoes of my work is definitely still painting and continue to be acrylic paint, but I’m starting to incorporate the use of tape and markers and objects,” he explains. “I’m basically treating my canvas like a collage with more emphasis on the painting part than the collage part.”

This show opens Saturday, July 3 at 10 AM and runs until July 22. The doors open at 10 AM.  The artists have so much to share, and they look forward to discussing their work and process at the artist opening from 5-7 on opening day. Shows on Maine Art Hill is at 10 Chase Hill Road in Kennebunk. Open daily, 10 AM to 5 PM. FMI visit maine-art.com/shows or call 967-0043.

SEE THE SHOW!

To see Bigbee’s 2021  Show, Click the link below

 

Interpretive Landscapes – Insights from Artist Claire Bigbee on her 2021 Show

“The only difference between representational painting and abstract painting is that the subject plays a more recessive role in abstract work. The visual aesthetic is the dominant force, not the narrative. Abstract work, above all, celebrates the aesthetic over the recognizable “nameable” subject.” – Mitchell Albala.

Words from Artist Claire Bigbee on Interpretive Landscapes…

“My 2021 show is a collection of paintings that are my interpretations inspired by nature filled with abstract shapes, movement, and patterns.

In the 17th and 18th centuries, two artists, Peter Paul Ruben’s and Tiepolo moved away from a value-based painting system. Rather than using light and dark to create form, they started spreading light onto the canvas using more bright and dull colors to depict form. Tiepolo juxtaposed two colors of equal intensity side by side, using one for light and one for shadow. The equanimity of using color creates energy or vibration that drives the eye all around the composition. Rather than using small brush strokes, I use bigger chunks of color expressing form more like an elastic or, as Hans Hoffman referred to in his theory of plasticity. The color relationships create depth a certain flatness versus modeling color through value.

In college, I was fascinated by my 2D design class and color theory assignments. We would cut up one-inch squares of Pantone color chips and place them on a different colored background. The purpose of this was to demonstrate how to use the two smaller squares of the same color. You can optically change that color, value, or saturation of the chip by the field of color behind it.

Many of these paintings are about those juxtapositions of playing with color modules. I use color to create form rather than value and line. Tiepolo bent the laws of nature to fit the laws of art. My brushwork isn’t hidden in carefully blended color transitions. It’s explosive. I put a color on my palette knife and fan it over the painting to find the right color harmonies. The painting acts as a stand-between me and nature and the viewer.

The painting shares that internal vibrance I feel from memory. We all know what a sunrise or sunset looks like. These paintings are my emotional and spiritual interpretations of those views.”

To see all available work from Claire Bigbee, click the link below.
To read more insights from Claire Bigbee, click the link below.
To see Bigbee’s 2021  Show, Click the link below

 

Acrylic and Paper, Yes Paper, on Canvas – Artist Insights from Ryan Kohler 2021

We love it when our artists share insights from their process. It is refreshing and honest to get to peek inside the struggles and the successes. Below is a bit of insight from Ryan Kohler.

“Lately, I’ve been working with acrylic and paper on canvas.  I’ve had great luck with just acrylic paintings over the years, and there’s nothing wrong with just stopping there. Still, I am always looking for ways to spice up my process and incorporate new techniques to push my paintings into new territory and to keep things interesting for myself as well.  I think I get bored with myself a lot, haha.  I’m never satisfied, so I keep moving and evolving, but always with the idea that I want to paint like myself in mind.  I’m very cautious about changing my style in a way that makes them no longer recognizable to my visual brand.  My visual language may change a bit, but I want to say the same things. I don’t want to look like other artists, so I’m very protective of that.

So why paper?   I think it’s just where I ended up in my experimenting.  Let me explain… It started this winter when I was just horribly bored with myself for the millionth time in my life.  I started experimenting, gluing, taping things to canvas, repainting, taping again.  Lots of little objects and stuff from the junk drawer were basically thrown at the canvas.  Well, that was enough to reset my brain, but I had to dial it all back a bit for the sake of longevity.  I had concerns about how long my paintings would last if I continued to paint like this.  I liked the freedom of adding/removing physical pieces to the painting.  And I knew that paint alone would never be enough for me ever again, but I had to find a reasonable, sustainable option to combine with it.  Long story short, I found paper.  Completely safe to use, glue-able, paintable, flexible, archival, and MILLIONS of colors.

I’ve always liked puzzles, and now my paintings are a bit like puzzles to me, except I get to make my own pieces, and they don’t have to fit exactly. In fact, things are much more interesting when I am imprecise, but in a fun and still descriptive way.  Charmingly incorrect is what I’ve been shooting for with this entire body of work.  When I am being too literal and too careful with my cutting and gluing, the paintings don’t breathe as well and feel uptight and labored.

When I think about it, it’s a lot like the palette knife oil paintings I’ve worked on in years past.  The result is similar because there are distinct planes of color and various shapes layered over each other.  The advantage of the paper, I find, is the workability and clarity of color and the ability to work in small areas, without the risk of the muddiness that can sometimes come with an oil painting that has been overworked.   The workability is great too.  If I’m fast enough, I can remove a recently glued piece or pieces that I don’t like. Sometimes a little blip of color is a great way to sort of activate a dead zone in a painting, as a little splash of excitement.  And it’s really convenient to be able to try out a certain color shape before gluing it on.  It’s hard to do that with paint.  Once it’s there, it’s there!  There’s lots of trial and error with the paper and fumbling around with clumsy bits of paper that seem never to fit anywhere. However, I still hang onto them all anyway, and it’s a beautiful feeling when the right shapes in the right color all come together in just the right way.

I’m really proud of these paintings, and I feel like they are the clearest vision I’ve had yet in my career and my most cohesive body, but it hasn’t been easy.  I had to change my materials, my workflow, even my easel set up.  I still like to paint a range of subject matter.  I bring my beloved duck boots around town in Skowhegan and pose them in various places.  I still love painting beautiful deer.  I love the wonky shapes of boat hulls, architecture, and all the old things that can be found in rural Maine.  We are all lucky to live in such a beautiful state.”

To see all available work from Ryan Kohler, click the link below.
To read more insights from Ryan Kohler, click the link below.
To see Kohler’s 2021  Show, Click the link below