INSPIRE – A Fundraiser for Real Men Wear Pink of Maine

When October comes to Maine, confetti-like leaves and frosted pumpkins find their way into everyone’s hearts and minds. The colors red, orange, and yellow often take center stage, but not for John Spain and Maine Art Hill. For Spain and many of his staff and artists, it’s all about The Pink. 

“October, for us, is about breast cancer awareness and the Real Men Wear Pink Campaign sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Yes, I have donned a bright pink unitard completed with a cape and mask to become Real Man to raise money for this very worthy cause. Yes, I have stood on red rock cliffs, crossed Lake Powell on a ferry boat, and spray painted the message in a mural in Texas,” laughs Spain. “However, my favorite part of my efforts is the annual art show featuring many of our artists who also support this incredible foundation.”

This year the show is called INSPIRE.

“It’s not about me inspiring others to donate or Real Men of Maine inspiring people to get involved and educated. It’s about them. It’s about the fighters, the ones who have conceded the fight and the ones who still fight every damn day. These men and women are the inspiration. This show and this campaign is a thank you for being the amazing people they are and inspiring the rest of us to be better, to do better,” explains Spain. “We all need to inspire each other. Collectively it’s what makes us great.”

INSPIRE is just that, a collective way to make a difference. As always, the fabulous and talented artists who contribute to this show make it such a success. Twenty percent of all sales go back to Real Men of Maine. This campaign has come together to help fight this fight and often provide a bit of a rest when needed most.

“We need to do this in any way we can,” says Spain. “This is my way.”

Be it a purchase of a painting or sculpture, a five-dollar or a hundred-dollar donation, be it a wig, a ride to chemo, or a place to sleep near the hospital. Everything counts. Everything makes a difference. Inspire is a verb. Loosely, inspire means to fill someone with the confidence and desire to do. Let’s do.

INSPIRE – a multi-artist show with proceeds benefiting Real Men Wear Pink of Maine in conjunction with the American Cancer Society. The show will run the entire October at Maine Art Hill at 14 Western Ave in Kennebunk, Maine. Doors open every day at 10 AM.

 

All of Maine – Artist Insights from Liz Hoag

When artist Liz Hoag has a fall show all to herself on Maine Art Hill, if nothing else, you know where to find a piece of quiet.

 

“My inspiration for this show is similar to my inspiration for past shows,” says artist Liz Hoag. “I still love the complex abstractions built into the structures of landscapes with trees.”

Hoag enjoys working with the changing light in the woods over the course of the day and the different color palettes that this allows her to work with. 

“I also like to interact with local scenes; wooded paths, Maine’s beautiful coastline, or working waterfronts. Whether it’s a coastal scene or a woodland scene,” she explains. “I love the peace that my painting style brings.”

 

Hoag doesn’t focus on extraneous details but instead tries to find the essential parts of a scene that bring out the light and a sense of place in a painting.

“By using larger strokes of color, I have to decide what to focus on and which choices would give me the overall color and design I’m looking for,” says Hoag.

To learn more about this artist, follow the links below

Liz Hoag’s Artist Insights and Stories

Liz Hoag’s Complete Collection at Maine Art Hill

Pop-Up with The Art Guild of the Kennebunks

 

The Art Guild of the Kennebunks is featured at the Pop-Up beginning Thursday, September 23, to Wednesday, September 29. Read on to learn more about the inspiration, process, and work.

September 23 – 29

In 1980 the Art Guild of the Kennebunks (AGK) was founded to foster camaraderie, support, and professional stimulation.  Beginning as a loosely knit organization, the Guild developed into a formal corporate structure with non-profit status.  AGK grants scholarships to deserving students in the visual arts from Kennebunk High School.

From the inception, members were and continue to be juried into the organization based on professional artistic criteria.

We have approximately 60 juried artist members representing various visual arts mediums, including painting, photography, printmaking, sculpting, textile art, and mixed media.

For more info about the Art Guild of the Kennebunks, check out the following links: 

Website

Email

A One Woman Show – Artist Liz Hoag at Maine Art Hill

Hoag is celebrating a one-woman show at The Gallery at Maine Art Hill in Kennebunk at 14 Western Avenue. This show opens Saturday, September 25, and runs until October 7. The doors open every day at 10 AM.

“The simplification, abstraction, and color choices come together to give it an open but also warm and comforting feeling of place,” says artist Liz Hoag.

Hoag’s current work is a refining of her ideas about composition, color, and light. In this work, she sheds realistic or narrative detail while retaining ideas. For example, more than depicting a detailed image of a place, the work retains a sense of place, but the most clearly defined ties to a specific location are absent.

“I use the woods as a starting point for an abstract idea. Then, by intentionally cropping the view, I consciously retain a substantive structural focal point within the composition,” shares Hoag. “I use other elements that guide the audience to look around the space and return to the focal point. The forms from nature I choose to retain are weighted and colored in a way that makes the viewer feel sure of their footing, feel balanced, feel comfortable.”

Hoag’s use of color and value gives depth to the realistic space at the same time it aids in the abstract two and three-dimensional balance. With different palette choices in each work, there is often a sense of season and time of day as well. This adds to the comfort the viewer experiences and a feel of a defined place.

“My use of negative space between trees or other elements enhances the push and pull of both the depth of the imagined landscape and the flat plane of the canvas,” explains Hoag. “It helps us travel through the space in more than one dimension. And I love the interplay that often comes off like stained glass.”

Artists learn to make forms turn in space and mimic what we see. Hoag is growing out of that system of seeing. She is looking for a connection to the real world that is more sensory and abstract than constructed.

“I still retain a feeling of solidity in wood or tree without the constraints of super-realistic painting. The work is not impressionist but contains impressionist elements,” says Hoag. “It maintains a solid base structure with light and color as interrelated collaborative elements.”

 

To learn more about this artist, follow the links below

Liz Hoag’s Artist Insights and Stories

Liz Hoag’s Complete Collection at Maine Art Hill

 

Pop-Up with Susan Adam

 

Featured Artist Susan Adam is the guest artist for Pop-Up beginning Thursday, September 9, to Wednesday, September 22. Read on to learn more about her inspiration, her process, and her work.

September 9 – 22

I am a child of the seventies raised primarily in the suburbs of Hartford, Connecticut. Every summer growing up, I longed to spend time with my grandmother, a painter who lived on the coast of Maine. Here she taught me a particular way of seeing the world, which was filled with color and beauty, and from that period on, I was determined to live in it. I was always creative. I did not start painting until college, where I met my husband of thirty years, a painter, and haven’t stopped since. From the start of my career, making a living as a full-time painter was a priority, so I developed a commissioned portrait business. For the past seventeen years, I have run a successful seasonal gallery next to our home.

I draw inspiration from my surroundings, the same small Maine village of my childhood summers for most of my career. I have always been drawn to color in the landscape, chasing red in a sea of blue, burnt umber in a field of green. My works explore the strong graphic potential everywhere I look, such as a curve in the road, a distant island in the bay, a commanding tree in the field, and more recently, a cluster of terra cotta rooftops in Champagne-Ardenne and the turquoise water of Bermuda.  A quiet scene painted in a bold graphic way invites the viewer to “fill in the blanks.”  Similarly, a circle representing a cloud or a rock right in the middle of a painting offset by another carefully selected color or line entices the viewer to focus elsewhere. Nicholas Silk of The Bermuda Royal Gazette described my work as “exploring the relationship of shapes where even inanimate objects seem to possess a storytelling potential…form almost shifts and melts before your eyes.

 

For more info about Susan Adam, check out the following links: 

Website

Instagram

207-326-7123

Water – Four Artists, One Place, Endless Possibilities

Maine Art Hill welcomes all to visit and view their last summer show of the season. Saturday, September 4, is the opening of Water, a four-artist show featuring new works from William B. Hoyt, Ellen Welch Granter, Jill Matthews, and Kathy Ostrander Roberts.

“If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water.” — Loren Eiseley.

New England is home to many talented artists. We are incredibly fortunate to represent some of the best, including these four diverse artists.

Jill Matthews is not only represented in Kennebunk. She is one of the lucky ones who get to call it home. Matthews’ palette is soft and welcoming, and her depiction of water brings the same feelings.

“My oil paintings have always been a representation of how I interpret the world. They hint at an exaggeration of simplicity. The process is often removal of unnecessary elements, leaving strength to what remains,” says Matthews. “When the extra fades into the distance, it allows something stronger to move forward into clarity. So often, we have to quiet the noise to truly see.”

Like Matthews, Kathy Ostrander Roberts calls the Kennebunks home. However, when working with Water, Roberts chooses wax as her medium instead of oil. The result is still simple, simple, and stunning.

“My goal is to represent the essence of Maine coastal waters in encaustic painting by capturing scenes from Southern Maine’s coastline and translating them into vibrant representations of movement and color,” shares Roberts. “Through layering and sculpting of the medium, I create depth and intrigue. I hope to spark memories and longings for Maine’s rugged shores in the hearts and eyes of the viewer.”

Memories and longing are also perfect descriptors for artist William B. Hoyt. They put to words his incredibly realistic renditions of the Water. To most, these are landscapes, but to Hoyt, they are stories. He has more stories to tell than most and remembers them in details as vibrant as his canvases.

“There is a challenge and a joy in seeing something ineffably beautiful or moving and resolving to make a painting of it. The threads of the canvas, the sea, family, friends, and Maine have woven themselves inextricably into my psyche and my work,” explains Hoyt. “I am a wanderer and an adventurer and have been fortunate in this life to be able to find and create and reproduce the beauty around me.”

Ellen Welch Granter is finishing off this foursome, which typically focuses on all that surrounds and relies on the Water, but not the Water itself. However, this time, it takes center stage, and boy, does it shine.

“Painting about Water is a bit like painting about paint. It is secretly about the effect of light on the Water. Sparkling or leaden, transparent or opaque, glossy or flat, the surface of the Water is always mesmerizingly beautiful,” says Granter. “With deeply saturated color fields, I tried to convey the sense of peace that the water surface inspires, and of course, the birds are always nearby.”

Again all are welcome to visit and view Water, a four artist show featuring new works from William B. Hoyt, Ellen Welch Granter, Jill Matthews, and Kathy Ostrander Roberts on Maine Art Hill at 14 Western Ave  in Kennebunk. The show opens Saturday, September 4, and runs through September 22. The gallery is open every day from 10 AM to 5 PM. FMI call 207-967-0049 or visit www.maine-art.com/shows.

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, September 1. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, September 3.

To see our complete collection of each artists’ works, click below

William B. Hoyt  –  Artist Page

Ellen Welch Granter  – Artist Page

Jill Matthews – Artist Page

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of each artist, click below.

William B. Hoyt – Insights and Stories

Ellen Welch Granter – Insights and Stories

Jill Matthews – Insights and Stories

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Insights and Stories

 

The Therapeutic Power of Water – Artist Insights from Ellen Welch Granter

“Painting about water is a bit like painting about paint,” says artist Ellen Welch Granter.

When viewing anything, it all breaks down into pieces of color. From there it is all in how you see it, or in Granter’s case, how you paint it.

“Secretly…it is about the effect of light on the water. Sparkling or leaden, transparent or opaque, glossy or flat, the water’s surface is always mesmerizingly beautiful,” shares Granter. “I tried to convey the sense of peace that the water surface inspires with deeply saturated color fields. Of course, the birds are nearby.”

Marsh wrens in the reeds are the subject of three paintings in this group. The flat pink water and gold reeds recede into the background so that the noisy wrens can sing their attention-grabbing song.

“In these paintings, I can get around the fact that in real life, deep in the marsh, wrens are usually very hard to see,” says Granter.  “And seen this way, you don’t get mosquito or greenhead bites.”

Between her birds and her brushes, Granter found a piece of peace during a time when it was rare but so necessary.

“During the horrible months of isolation, I was delighted to have this painting challenge as an antidote to the meditative trance of that constant tech connection,” explains Granter. “Creating this series of paintings was my effort to remember to keep it simple but keep it beautiful. And it helped, as art always does.”

Granter truly celebrates water in this new collection of work. There are familiar aspects that assure you it is an original Ellen Welch Granter. Then, of course, there are a few surprises.

All are welcome to visit and view Water, a four artist show featuring new works from William B. Hoyt, Ellen Welch Granter, Jill Matthews, and Kathy Ostrander Roberts on Maine Art Hill at 14 Western Ave in Kennebunk. The show opens Saturday, September 4, and runs through September 22. The gallery is open every day from 10 AM to 5 PM. FMI call 207-967-0049 or visit www.maine-art.com/shows.

 

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, September 1. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, September 3.

To see our complete collection of each artists’ works, click below

William B. Hoyt  –  Artist Page

Ellen Welch Granter  – Artist Page

Jill Matthews – Artist Page

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of each artist, click below.

William B. Hoyt – Insights and Stories

Ellen Welch Granter – Insights and Stories

Jill Matthews – Insights and Stories

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Insights and Stories

Big Water – Artist Insights from Jill Matthews

“I am so excited to be included in the WATER show. Painting the coast and the water is my favorite subject matter and what I feel most connected with,” shares Maine Art Hill artist Jill Matthews.

Matthews is one of four artists participating in WATER at the Shows on Maine Art Hill.

“I decided to work much larger for this show. It’s a bit of a challenge for me. I can’t focus on one spot of the canvas for too long. After all, it’s so large I have to constantly be backing up, taking in all in, and reworking things,” says Matthews.  “I can move around a big piece differently than I can a smaller one. It’s free, but I still have to focus. So it’s a little mix of both.”

When she works smaller,  Matthews tends to get hyper-focused on specific things.

“It is a bit looser with a larger canvas, but I have to see the big picture. I enjoy working with a bigger surface, especially when the ocean’s subject matter, with a focus on the sky,” she says.  “I love the larger landscape spans.”

Matthews’s other passion is running. It is always lovely when two passions can support each other.

“I spend a lot of time outside. For example, I am training for the Boston Marathon this fall. Due to the heat, I am up in the early morning, getting in a run, and then again during evening hours. There is a great deal of inspiration on these runs,” explains Matthews. “They give me time to explore the coast’s landscape in a way I haven’t seen before.”

When water is concerned, weather plays a big part in what we see. Even for trained artists, it’s difficult not to let the weather influence the art.

“We have had a great deal of different weather this summer—a lot of rain. I wanted to focus on the sky and how it interacts with the rest of the landscape. I usually don’t focus on the sky and have preferred a foggy landscape,” Matthews shares. “That takes the sky out of it. I need to focus on what the sky is doing. It’s a new challenge. It gives me a chance to focus on color and texture differently concerning how the sky interacts with other elements. It has been fun.”

This show was a chance to explore what I love to do: paint water and connect with the coast. Yet this time, I was pushed to do it differently.

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, September 1. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, September 3.

To see our complete collection of each artists’ works, click below

William B. Hoyt  –  Artist Page

Ellen Welch Granter  – Artist Page

Jill Matthews – Artist Page

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of each artist, click below.

William B. Hoyt – Insights and Stories

Ellen Welch Granter – Insights and Stories

Jill Matthews – Insights and Stories

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Insights and StoriesArtist

My View of the Water – Artist Insights from William B. Hoyt for WATER

After following artist, William B. Hoyt for years, there is no other that captures the light and love found in water.  Hoyt is also quite famous for his storytelling abilities. With that said, we are fortunate to have him share a little insight into a few of the pieces he created for WATER.

Morning on Muscle Ridge

This view greeted me after a night in our Westfalia at the Lobster Buoy Campground in South Thomaston, Maine. As the fog burned off, it gradually revealed the islands. Muscle Ridge was named from the effort needed to row to and from these islands that had working granite quarries and hundreds of resident stonecutters.

Castles Made of Sand 

The incoming tide reminded me of Jimi Hendrix’s lyrics, “And castles made of sand melt in the sea, eventually.” We spent a week in a house on Parson’s Beach in Kennebunk and saw creations made by children at low tide melt into the sea as they shrank the beach ineluctably.

The Nubble 

This often photographed lighthouse in York, Maine, presented its stark rock-bound appearance on a bright day in April in the early afternoon. Not sure why it’s called the Nubble. Maybe before it had a lighthouse, the extension of the point, almost attached by an isthmus at low tide, was described as a “Nubble,” and the name stuck. I really enjoyed painting the complex rock formations and the sparkling water as well as the handsome lighthouse itself.

 

Moon Over St. Anne’s

At sunset on April 26th, the full super moon, The Pink Moon, rises slowly out of the still bare trees over St. Anne’s Church. This is seen from the western end of Gooch’s Beach.  April’s full moon corresponds with the early springtime blooms of phlox, also called “moss pink.”

The Soft Sounds of Surf 

High tide in the morning. Where’s the beach? At low tide, it’s a hundred yards wide, but this morning, we are awakened at sunrise to find it lapping at the cement retaining wall and the foot of the wooden stairs.

Reflections

Sunrise through clouds over the calm waters in the enclosed bay of Roque island. This is inside the arms of the mile-long curved beach and encircling smaller islands.

 

 

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, September 1. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, September 3.

To see our complete collection of each artists’ works, click below

William B. Hoyt  –  Artist Page

Ellen Welch Granter  – Artist Page

Jill Matthews – Artist Page

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of each artist, click below.

William B. Hoyt – Insights and Stories

Ellen Welch Granter – Insights and Stories

Jill Matthews – Insights and Stories

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Insights and Stories

Water in Wax – Artist Insights from Kathy Ostrander Roberts

We love it when our artists take a few minutes to explain exactly what it is they do. Artist Kathy Ostrander Roberts breaks down how she works and how the magic happens.

Click to watch.

 

To see the show in its entirety, including the 360-degree virtual tour, click here.

Preview opens Wednesday, September 1. Virtual Tour is available on the evening of Friday, September 3.

To see our complete collection of each artists’ works, click below

William B. Hoyt  –  Artist Page

Ellen Welch Granter  – Artist Page

Jill Matthews – Artist Page

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Artist Page

To read more about the process, inspiration, and background of each artist, click below.

William B. Hoyt – Insights and Stories

Ellen Welch Granter – Insights and Stories

Jill Matthews – Insights and Stories

Kathy Ostrander Roberts – Insights and Stories