Blossoming at Maine Art

04/06/2017 0 Comments
 

The Language of Flowers - Barbara Peabody

After last week’s winter storm, we have our fingers crossed that spring is truly on her way.  Soon the grass will be green, and the branches on the trees will succumb to that lovely glow of new growth. Once spring has started, she usually rolls right along, which means the flowers are sure to follow. These are our favorite signs of the season here at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, and the favorite of many of our artists, as well.

If you, like us, are a bit impatient and want to fill your home with the brilliant flowers of Maine’s warmer seasons, come and visit. Our flowers are always blooming. Whether it be the poppies and delphiniums of Sandra L. Dunn, in Royal Purple Delphinium and Profusion of Poppies, or the simple strokes of Philip Frey’s Blooms, these up-close, still lifes bring color and light to any room.

Royal Purple Delphinium Sandra Dunn Blooms - Philip Frey Profusion of Poppies - Sandra Dunn

If you prefer the beauty the blooms bring to the exterior of your home and the way your yard comes alive, works like No Thyme Farm from Karen McManus and End of May from Abbie Williams will help remind you that springtime is upon us.

No Thyme Farm - Karen McManus End of May - Abbie Williams

Even Lyman Whitaker is in on the fun with his very popular, Tulip. There are few buds that can stand winds up to ninety miles per hour and look glorious covered in snow. This is a flower for all seasons; always in bloom and no watering necessary.

Prendergast, Christine copy

Of course, with the flowers come the birds and the bees. Spring would not be the same without them. Both Trip Park and Ellen Granter celebrate these little creatures. Lilac Lover is a fun and colorful portrayal of one of our favorite pollen spreaders, and Bonita and Soon Soon are beautiful reminders of the wonders Mother Nature is about to unfurl on us.

Soon Soon - Ellen GranterLilac Lover - Trip Park Bonita - Ellen Granter

So — if you need a little pick-me-up, and flowers make you happy, find your way to 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk. You can always find a hint of spring in the air. Until then, we can settle for Lobsters and Champagne and its little pot of blooms, much like William B Hoyt, as he too waits for spring to blossom.

Lobsters and Champange - William B Hoyt

Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture is now open seven days a week. Click here for hours.

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Recharging His Artist Batteries – William B. Hoyt

10/27/2016 0 Comments
 

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Everyone needs to take time aways from their busy schedule to recharge and rejuvenate.  We all lead such busy lives. With work and family obligations, we often forget how important it is to take care of our own selves. Everyone does this in a different way. Spa time, curling up with a good book, exercise, or being outdoors do it for many. For William B. Hoyt, it is reminding himself that work is also something he loves. Taking time to just paint, especially with other like-minded souls, does wonders for his own.

“This August I found myself in a covey of painters, out on Pemaquid Point on a beautiful day painting plein air. It was workshop for alumni of Julien Merrow-Smith’s, ‘Painting in Provence’,” said Hoyt. “I sort of crashed the party. I came with my friends Hope and Rob. They are actually in the painting, fourth and fifth from the left.”

Hoyt can fly by the seat of his pants like few others.  He embraces the moment and absorbs all he can from each experience that wanders across his path, or in this case an experience he wandered upon.

“I often paint outside but have never done a workshop. I had just mounted a big show for you at Maine Art and had spent months before in my studio. I had been doing mostly larger works,” said Hoyt. “Then this happened. I thought it might be just the thing to recharge my batteries.”

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It was. The six small studies, two of which are above, were his output during the workshop, showing various scenes out on Pemaquid Peninsula. This larger painting, The Way Life Should Be, was a piece he worked on after the workshop and shows about half of the fifteen artists painting that day.  A painting of painters; that is inspiration.

William B. Hoyt has been with Maine Art for more than thirteen years. We have a continuously growing and changing collection of his work. To view it in its entirety, please visit his Artist Page, William B. Hoyt at Maine Art. To read more about Hoyt and his work with Maine Art, see his featured posts on our Blog Page; Insights and Stories from William B. Hoyt.

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William B. Hoyt on Being a Navy Man

08/29/2016 0 Comments
 

hoytwithadmiralNot for Sale

Lieutenant JG Hoyt giving a painting to Admiral Richardson of the Sixth Fleet.

“When I was twenty-three, I was in the Navy on the staff of the Commander of the Sixth Fleet, the Mediterranean Fleet. It was the late 60’s, during Vietnam, but things were also hot in the Middle East. It was the ’67 war with Israel and Egypt. We had quite a presence over there. Aircraft carriers and submarines. Fifty US ships. There was a lot of support. My official title was Communications Launch Officer. I was a part of the staff who handled the thousands of messages coming in though the teletypewriters. As a junior officer, I stood watch and managed the enlisted people who were actually doing all the work. I also decoded top secret messages, then hand-delivered them and sat while they were read.  All of the paperwork had to be dealt with as top secret. There was a public affairs officer on the ship who came up with this idea of having me go around the fleet to create paintings of the fleet activities. The mission was really just a lot of flag waving. NATO and US presence. We were basically there to intervene if Russia stepped out of line. The navy had musicians who just played music, that was their job. There was a band on the aircraft carrier that went into port a few days early and gave concerts. It softened up the locals to the US soldiers who would soon arrive. Anyway… The idea was to accompany the musicians with paintings of what was going on out in the field.  He sold the idea to the Admiral, and I was sent out on an aircraft carrier, a destroyer, an amphibious assault ship, everything except a submarine. I had a set of orders from the Admiral, and everyone did what he said. The set of orders was sent ahead and read something like this. ‘Render Lieutenant JG Hoyt whatever assistance required for the completion of his duty.’ I would arrive on a destroyer, and the captain always met me. ‘What can we do? Where would you like the boat?’ I was overwhelmed. ‘No. No. No.’ I said.  Can’t you just see it? ‘Move the boat over there.’ Then all hell breaks loose.”

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To read more stories from Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5 at Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day. Please come by and visit.

You can also view his entire show online at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

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William B. Hoyt on “Underway”

08/28/2016 0 Comments
 

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“A few years ago, a friend of mine, Frank, bought this amazing boat. He and his brother sailed it over from Europe.  She was built for the North Sea, so she’s a hearty vessel. Crossing over is a real learning process, but Frank is a very brave man.

This particular trip was in late September/early October, and started in Northeast Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We were headed to the most beautiful place, Roque Island. We entered in through the little islands you see in the distance, and we found ourselves in this perfectly calm water. In front of us was a mile of white sand beach which is very atypical of in Maine.

The island belongs to the Gardner family. They have keepers who live there. It is now a working farm; animals and horses and beautiful buildings.  They are happy to have boats anchor and go on the beach, but at the wooded line it becomes private.

This particular image was from our last morning, and the sun was just coming up through the scrim of cloud. We were underway – chugging out. The sea ducks were taking off,  barely skimming the surface. It is an incredible, undisturbed spot.”

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To read more stories from William B. Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5 at Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day. Please come by and visit.

You can also view his entire show on-line at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

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Learn more about Rogue Island by clicking here    

William B. Hoyt – Hawaiian Waves

08/25/2016 0 Comments
 

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Hawaiian Waves – Moluahah Bay, Kauai

“I’ll tell you something about these waves…

Hawaiian waves are much more powerful than waves on the East Coast. They are coming out of water that is 10,000 feet deep.  When they approach the land, the land isn’t shoaled. There are no shallows. The islands are basically mountains, and they are a 70 degree angle. They go to the bottom of the sea. When these things feel the bottom, they’re feeling the bottom just before they break. A six foot wave has power.”

Hoyt_Study for Wave

This is where he starts to chuckle, as does his wife, Kathy, whose desk is within earshot. “I have surfed on the East Coast, and I have bodysurfed in Hawaii with a boogie board. And that is a story.”

Each time a new story starts, Hoyt takes a second to reflect on the memory. In his mind the images come back coupled with the senses that complete the scene.

“We were at a beach on Kauai, and this wave picked me up and just drove me down into the sand. It basically crammed my head into my neck,” he begins to stammer in recollection.  “So, I was standing there with stars in my eyes, holding my head, when I hear these twelve-year-old boys next to me say, ‘Boy did you see that old guy just get barreled?’ “

“Oh, I got barreled—wicked.”

Hoyt_Right Wave

To read more stories from Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5 at Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day. Please come by and visit.

You can also view his entire show online at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

WilliamHoyt

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William Hoyt on Vermont and Margarite Williams

08/21/2016 0 Comments
 

margaritewilliamsNot for Sale

Margarite Williams

“I ended up in Bellows Falls, Vermont in 1971 while visiting friends. One of them had discovered photography, and he was spending a lot of time down at the railroad station. In the station was the Depot Lunch and News, and the sole proprietor, Margarite Williams. She had come down to work at the age of sixteen from St. Johnsbury. Years later, the place was threatened with closing due to railroad business being way down. A local businessman, who liked having breakfast there, bought the place and sold it to Margarite for one dollar under the condition she would stay. She was installed in the Bellows Falls Train Station with a little room in the back.  There was a paper company still working, and the railroad workers, and then hippies like us. ‘Young people’. There was a wave of young people who overwhelmed Vermont in the 70’s. I had just gotten out of the Navy.  I never went home, I’ve been here ever since.

Margarite Williams was a sweet wonderful woman, probably in her sixties. We would come in and sit on these old, art deco style stools that spun around and had red plastic seats. The Formica countertop was worn away from so many elbows. My friend, Gregory, was down there a lot and would come back and give slide shows at the house, which was slowly becoming a commune. It was the three of them when I moved in. At most, I think we got up to about thirteen people living in the old farm house.

Every May 11th, we celebrated her birthday, which we have continued to do even years after her death. We’ve gathered down at the station decades after she passed away. She had a very nurturing way, and she really listened. She just had a wonderful way of speaking. She had a cat whose name was Tig and geraniums in the windows. It was an endearing scene. We were sort of her ‘lost boys.’”

WilliamHoyt

To read more stories from William B. Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5 at Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day. Please come by and visit.

You can also view his entire show on-line at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

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A Bit About Emma

08/19/2016 0 Comments
 

Hoyt_Annie and Emma

Emma C. Berry is a beautiful little fishing sloop at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut. She is one of the oldest surviving commercial vessels in America, and the last known surviving American well smack. Well smacks were designed to keep the catch alive through an internal water-filled compartment, known as a wet well. Seawater circulated through large holes in the bottom planking. She was built in 1866 at the Palmer Shipyards in Noank, Connecticut by James A. Latham.

She was named for Captain John Henry Berry’s daughter.  In 1886, she was rigged as a schooner,  and in 1916, a gasoline engine was added. She has undergone many restorations, and is presently restored to her original configuration and period. In 1992, for the first time in 106 years, the Emma C. Berry sailed from Mystic Seaport down to Fishers Island Sound under sloop rig.

She was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1994.

*Hoyt captured Emma and her harbor mate, Annie, in a photograph back in September of 2015 before her latest restoration took place.

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To read more stories from Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5 at Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day. Please come by and visit.

You can also view his entire show online at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

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Decisions, Decisions – The Process of William B. Hoyt

08/18/2016 0 Comments
 

Hoyt_The Pink Moon

William B. Hoyt’s studio is contained in a cupola on the top of his beautiful home in Hartland, Vermont. With a view of New Hampshire, this artist’s oasis is where the magic has happened for over twenty-five years. He spends most winter days up in his sunlit room working on inspiration he found during his summertime wanderings.

Having a studio in your home allows for a bit of fluctuation in a schedule, but still Hoyt attempts an eight hour day when he is at home.  There are usually breaks for dog walking and lunch, but many hours are spent at the easel. On average, Hoyt takes two-and-a-half to three weeks to complete a painting. However, he recalls one that took him almost ten weeks from start to finish.

Hoyt says, “There is an old feller up in Barnard, Vermont, by the name of Bill Cobb. One day, someone asked him how many hours he worked a day.  He said he worked from ‘can ’til can’t.’ That’s me.”

The first step when beginning a painting is choosing a surface. Hoyt’s varies depending on what his subject is. From canvas to panel, the texture is a factor in the decision of which one to choose. The more detail, the smoother the surface.

“I change my work surface frequently and experiment with how paint mixtures interact with each. If I am working on something with a great deal of detail, I choose a panel for the smooth texture.  A rough canvas with lots of tooth with show all the gradations, but makes for beautiful sky.”

Hoyt is an artist who prefers to sketch out a subject before beginning to paint. For anyone familiar with his work, saying he is detailed is an understatement. Photographic is a term often used when describing a finished Hoyt piece.

“Normally, I sketch on the surface before I begin with any paint, so another variable for me is what I use to draw the image. I tend to use charcoal on a rougher canvas and a pencil on a smoother canvas. Then, on a really smooth canvas, I use a stick of silver. Sometimes, I will use all three depending on the level of detail I want to achieve before I start painting.”

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Then comes the decision of medium. Oil paint is the choice, but never does he use it directly from the tube. With a texture of butter, it must be mixed, usually with linseed oil, but even that comes in different forms. Then there are resins that can be added, as well as ingredients to alter drying time. Finding the perfect concoction is an ongoing process that he is continually altering.

“I’m always looking for the ideal mixture,” says Hoyt, “but nothing is ideal. The surface I am painting on effects the behavior of the paint. When I begin a painting, the surface is kind of dry, very white and a little bit rough. As I continue to work and build up paint, it changes. It changes day to day.”

Hoyt can always imagine something better. Everyday he tries to reinvent the ideal medium. He makes extensive notes about what he adds, the reaction to the surface and how the paint finishes.“I’m like a cook. I keep track of my recipes,” he says, referring to just one of many dated entries in a book next to his easel.

Wimby's Log

When experiencing a Hoyt painting, the details are incredible. It takes time to absorb all that has gone into the creation of these fantastic works of art. As much as we try to duplicate in digital, seeing them in person is best.  We hope you have the chance to visit Kennebunk and Kennebunkport and stop in at a Maine Art Shows. Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day.

WilliamHoyt

To read more stories from Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

You can also view his entire show online at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

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William Hoyt on the Harbor Fish Market and the Seagull Explosion

08/14/2016 0 Comments
 

Hoyt_Harbor Fish Market

“Kathy and I were in Portland down on Commercial Street. We had been revisiting old venues, and I was feeling a bit uninspired. Walking out on the pier, we looked at different angles. As we were coming back in, a lobsterman pulled up and was loading his traps. As we stood there, more and more seagulls appeared, as if they knew. Then the door to the fish market opened. The man came out with a tub of fish guts or something, and suddenly the air was filled with seagulls. The seagull explosion just caught my eye.

I needed to come back and let the pictures create themselves.

I completed the setting with a few birds, then I had to figure out which birds would make it to the big canvas. This is where the studies began. I had to have many practice panels before I was ready to put them into the large piece. Based on the studies, I started deciding where to place each seagull, or not to place it at all. I would spend a day painting various birds and working the sky and putting clouds in. Then, I’d call Kathy to come up and ask her what she thought. Her response was always the same. ‘Well, there were more birds.’

 

Hoyt_Gulls

We have counted forty-five birds in all! The one over next to the traps was the last one I did. When I add an element to a painting, it changes the balance of where I am looking. It became an empty space. It needed a bird.

I also broke lines with a few seagulls. I’ve noticed over the years, artists tend to avoid placing objects over one another. In nature, that doesn’t happen. I’ve tried to make them cross over to make it seem more natural.”

WilliamHoyt

To read more stories from William B. Hoyt regarding his work at Maine Art, click here –  Artist Insights – William B. Hoyt.

Hoyt’s one-man show will be running through September 5 at Maine Art Shows in Kennebunk. We are open from 11am – 5pm every day. Please come by and visit.

You can also view his entire show online at William Hoyt at Maine Art Shows.

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The Painted Words of William B. Hoyt – A One-Man Show

08/10/2016 0 Comments
 

Hoyt_Spirits of the Water

Artists have been traveling to coastal Maine for decades, each trying to capture the beauty of the land and waters bordering it. William B. Hoyt is an artist who not only knows and loves this area, but works and plays here frequently.  Each of his canvases have an almost photographic quality. This attention to detail forces the viewer to lean in closer to experience every facet that forms the whole and becomes classic Maine.

Hoyt says, “There is a challenge and a joy in seeing something ineffably beautiful or moving and resolving to make a painting of it. The threads of the canvas, the sea, family, friends and Maine have woven themselves inextricably into my psyche and my work.”

Hoyt has always been an artist. He is one of few who haven’t ever been anything else. His medium may change from oils on canvas, to film or digital photography, or even to hammer and wood when he built his home and studio in Vermont. The need to create is always there, especially during the summer, and especially when he is in Maine.

“When summer is here, it means en plein air; being outside and finding the next fascination. I spend my winters with studio work. Summer is about inspiration and collection,” says Hoyt.  “Sometimes I go looking, often early in the morning before setting sail for the next harbor, or toward the end of the day after we anchor and the harsh light softens. Other times a subject recommends itself unsolicited with the realization that a painting is staring me in the face.”

Hoyt_Whale Boats

An artist sees the world through different eyes, and it is rare to find Hoyt without his camera close at hand. He is always collecting moments and has trouble not stopping to at each scene with the possibility it may someday be committed to paint. “Images are everywhere,” he says. “Some wonder if my need to stop and snap ever gets in the way. I can’t help but find that funny. It doesn’t get in the way; it is the way.”

Hoyt is a wanderer and an adventurer. He has been fortunate in his life to be able to find and create and reproduce the beauty around him. He has more stories to tell than most and remembers them in details as vibrant as his canvases.

John Spain, owner of Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture and Maine Art Shows, explains the fusion of Hoyt’s story with his art, “I have been very fortunate to have had the unique experience of visiting Wimby’s home and studio. It is truly an insight. Where most have photographs of people and memories, he and his wife Kathy have paintings. On top of that, each and every one has a story that can only be told by the master storyteller himself.”

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In an attempt to truly share the man behind the art, we have coupled each of Hoyt’s pieces with his memories, inspirations, and words of insight. These stories highlight his work and share his thoughts. In addition, Hoyt has added private studies and family sketches (not for sale) to this one-of-a-kind show.

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William B. Hoyt’s show opens at Maine Art Shows on Saturday, August 13, running through Monday, September 5.  As always, we will have an Artist’s Reception from 5-7 PM on opening night. This will provide a wonderful opportunity to meet and talk with the artist himself. The show can be viewed on our website beginning Wednesday, August 10, at www.maine-art.com/shows.

There will also be No Sales Sneak Peek on Friday, August 12, during The Village Art Walk.  Please wander up and enjoy a glass of wine and a quieter time to talk with the artist.

Maine Art Shows, located at 10 Chase Hill Road,  is open daily from 11 AM to 5 PM. FMI call 207-967-0049.

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