6th Annual Choice Art Show – “Dining Alfresco” by William B. Hoyt

06/14/2017 0 Comments
 

Dinner Alfresco by William B. Hoyt

Choosing a favorite painting is not always an easy task for an artist. This year, however, William B. Hoyt did not find his decision difficult.

“Oh, this painting was an easy choice for me. It’s an illustration of the Maine state motto,” laughs Hoyt as he goes on to explain. “My daughter, Gwen, her husband and their four children come to Maine in the summer. Their house looks out on Gilkey Harbor in Islesboro. It’s a good stopover for the windjammers. They come sailing in at the end of the day and drop anchor, often leaving their mainsails up until everything else is settled.”

Hoyt is a lover of all things Maine, especially the sailboats, and often his imagination and attention are caught by the simple things Maine has to offer.

“The setting sun bathed us in light when it dropped below the eaves of the porch. The water sparkled and danced with it,” says Hoyt. “I have to pinch myself when a scene like this unfolds before me. It’s practically sensory overload.”

Even though Hoyt’s home and studio are in Vermont, his heart is often in Maine. His summer travels bring him in and out of the most remote parts of our coast, both by land and by sea. It is what gets him through those long snows of winter.

“I save the beauty of these moments for later, sometimes months later. In the dead of winter when snow is piling up on my skylights, I have to stop painting to go out and clear it off, shovel the walk, and put more wood in the stove. Then I am able to go back to ‘work’ and paint and enjoy ‘the way life should be’ and that brief perfect moment of summer.”

Dining Alfresco is just one of three pieces from William B. Hoyt in the 6th Annual Choice Art Show. Visit Maine Art Shows from June 10th to June 29th to see the 6th Annual Choice Art Show in person. We are located at 10 Chase Hill Road in Kennebunk. The gallery is open every day from 11AM – 5PM. FMI, please call at 207-967-0049 or email at info@maine-art.com.

Click the logo below see the complete show online.

 

To view our complete collection of Hoyt’s Work – William B. Hoyt – Artist Page

To read more about William B. Hoyt, his process, and his work – William B. Hoyt – Artist Insights

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6th Annual Choice Art Show – “Marsh Sky IV” by Margaret Gerding

06/12/2017 0 Comments
 

Come meet Margaret at Toroso from 5-7. Click here for details.

Marsh Sky IV

Margaret Gerding lives locally and is able to truly capture the southern Maine area. Margaret’s Artist’s Choice in this year’s Choice Art Show, Marsh Sky IV, was inspired by an early morning jaunt down the road to Goose Rocks Beach.

“The clouds held a multitude of colors, yet somehow remained gentle and soft. It is this sense of calm that I hope is portrayed here,” says Gerding. “After my first full year living in Kennebunkport, I have realized my love for the salt marsh is so dependent on its connection with the sky. Until I experienced it day after day, I didn’t recognize how different and strong the coastal light is. Each day offers something new.”

The locals and the tourists alike recognize these marshes and have fallen in love with them as Gerding has. “I have always been drawn to this area where the meandering waterways change with the tides, the long grass shows its golden colors, and the protective stance of distant trees is forever present.”

When Margaret Gerding begins to look forward to spring each year, she gives herself a “push” to get excited again. Whether it be through color, especially yellow, or exploring different subject matters like strong clouds and flowers.

“I have always loved painting flowers. They give me a burst of color and subject matter I can have in front of me,” says Gerding.  “After working the winter months from sketches and pictures this is very welcome. By April I miss painting outside and the flowers remind me of things to come.” Gerding has also traveled extensively, and recalling those memories continues to inspire. “I loved France and the lavender fields, and the sunflower fields of Italy,” she says.

While most people are running to the store for milk and supplies for the March/April snow storms, Gerding is scurrying off to the grocery store in search of flowers in order to keep painting. Her teaching schedule is geared toward the winter months, so she can leave warm weather open for lots of plein air and studying.

Marsh Sky IV is one of three pieces from Margaret Gerding in the 6th Annual Choice Art Show. Visit Maine Art Shows from June 10th to June 29th to see the 6th Annual Choice Art Show in person. We are located at 10 Chase Hill Road in Kennebunk. The gallery is open every day from 11AM – 5PM. FMI, please call at 207-967-0049 or email at info@maine-art.com.

Margaret Gerding

Click the logo below to see the complete show online.

To view our complete collection of Gerding’s Work – Margaret Gerding – Artist Page

To read more about Margaret Gerding, her process, and her work – Margaret Gerding – Artist Insights

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Charles Bluett – A New Artist at Maine Art

06/01/2017 0 Comments
 

Along the Coast

This is always an exciting time for us here at Maine Art. With so much going on this summer already, it is an added bonus to be able to introduce you to another amazing New England artist, Charles Bluett.

Charles was born in Brussels, Belgium in 1965 where his parents happened to be working at the time. Both his parents are English, however, so they soon moved to the county of Kent, England, where he grew up.

Bluett says, “At 13, we moved again. Westminster, the heart of London, was quite the opposite from Kent’s natural beauty. We lived about 700 meters from Big Ben, the iconic Houses of Parliament and five minutes from the Old Tate gallery, before the New Tate was constructed on the South Bank of the Thames. This is where I first discovered my passion for art, but especially painting. I spent many hours sitting in the Rothko Room there, surround by his ethereal color panels.”

Bluett has spent the best part of his adult life in the US. He didn’t start painting in earnest until he moved to New York City as a young man back in the late 1980’s. Even then, it was purely as a thing he took huge private pleasure from doing; a hobby.

The Little Valley View

“It was a visit from Charlie Phillips who changed all that. Charlie ran an influential gallery in the West End of London with Harry Blain. He came to the house for dinner, saw my work, and offered me my first solo exhibition. This was back in the early 90’s. In the same month, I was also selected by The Royal Academy of Art in Piccadilly, the epicenter of British art for centuries, to feature in the Annual Summer Exhibition. This is where I sold my first work ever commercially. It was a great honor and a humbling experience. I remember taking my dear mother up the hallowed steps of the Royal Academy the day before the opening of the exhibit. We viewed my work in the most prestigious art institution in England. She had always been very supportive of my painting, and this was a definite ‘ah-ha’ moment for me.”

Bluett had a number of solo exhibitions in London and the US, but it was not until January of 2016, that life finally showed him that he must do this full time.

“Life is simply too short not to follow your passion. My wife had fallen ill with cancer, and after we were blessed to come through the other side, I decided it was time to stop compromising and use the gift I had been given to its fullest.”

For Bluett, this decision stays with him daily. After he spends what he considers a highly productive day completing a piece of work, he leaves his studio for the day walking backwards. He stares at the final piece through his studio door windows and contemplates.

“I am always still considering whether it is complete or not. Then, I turn toward the outdoor view ahead of me and see a twilight sky, a blazon sunset or simple tree line, and I am filled with so much color and energy. I smile to myself, realizing I should never take myself that seriously. In all I do, given what is laid out before me by ‘the powers that be’ in such scale and natural wonder, I keep perspective. I always try hard to be a part of it all. It is the important message I am left with, and I enjoy and relish the gifts I have been given, whatever they may be. This always makes me smile. Thankfully, it happens very often.”

Upstate

Bluett currently resides in Vermont with his lovely and hugely understanding wife, Suzy, his two kids, Ty and India, and a large number of critters, from horses to cats and dogs.

Be on the lookout for more posts about Charles Bluett, his inspirations and his process. His work is like no other in our gallery and certainly is worth a peek in person. We are open every day, but please check our website for hours.

**If you can’t make it to the Kennebunks soon, check out our complete collection of his work on his artist page. Charles Bluett – Artist Page.

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Rebecca Kinkead’s Spring Show

05/18/2017 2 Comments
 

Barn Owl (Blue Yonder) - Rebecca Kinkead

When an artist loves and is inspired by her subjects, the joy and passion is evident in the work. It emanates from the canvas and the room is filled. Beginning Memorial Day weekend, the entire first floor of Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture will be filled with the joy and passion of artist, Rebecca Kinkead.

John Spain, owner of Maine Art says, “This is Rebecca’s second show with Maine Art. We were incredibly happy with the success of her first show with us last summer. The gallery was visited by collectors from across New England. Kinkead’s work is like no other artist we represent. There is an energy and life she creates with her medium. It simply must be seen to be appreciated.”

Kinkead’s process is a bit different from classic oil painting. With the addition of chalk powder and linseed oil, she creates a concoction she can seriously get her hands into. For her, it is more than just a physical process, it is a feeling.

Kinkead explains, “Paint and wax are layered, dripped and scraped to create a sense that the subject is still emerging…still ‘becoming’. When I begin a painting, I often start with my fingers in the wax/paint mixture. I feel the form with my fingers. The more familiar the form, like my dogs, the easier it flows. Working with my hands allows me to find the form faster, easier, and more naturally.”

Fetch (Sunrise) - Rebecca Kinkead

Her dogs, all three of them, are featured in one of her many series, aptly named, Fetch. This year’s show will also contain works from her Traveler and Cannonball collections, which feature children. The inspiration for these pieces is a personal one, as well.

“A few years back I received a Christmas card from a friend. Her daughter was on top of a mountain leaning into the wind. I remember that feeling, that freedom. It reminded me of trust – trusting one’s self and trusting one’s environment,” says Kinkead. “I think some of my best paintings have come from trusting my gut, letting go, and not thinking too much, the same way children often do.”

Meadow Bloom - Rebecca Kinkead

Kinkead’s first degree was from the University of Vermont. Yet it was while she was working on her Master’s Degree in Experiential Learning at Minnesota State University, Mankato, that she found her love of ceramics. Soon after that graduation, however, when in a tiny studio apartment in Boston with room for an easel only, she tucked away her clay and picked up her paintbrush.

“I have painted professionally since 1999. In 2009, I made the move to my present studio in Vermont,” says Kinkead. “I had worked in acrylics for seven years. In the past, I didn’t have the open space or ventilation for oil. Once I moved to Vermont, this was no longer a problem. It took me almost six years to get to know this new medium, but I will never go back. Oil is just delicious to work with.”

Rebecca Kinkead

Rebecca Kinkead’s one-woman show opens Saturday, May 27, with a an artist’s reception that same evening from 5-7 pm. The show runs through Thursday, June 17. Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk, is open daily from 10 am to 5 pm. FMI call 207-967-2803. Kinkead’s show can be viewed online beginning Thursday, May 25, at www.maine-art.com/shows.

To see all of our collection of Kinkead’s work click here. Rebecca Kinkead – Artist Page

To read more about Rebecca, her process, and her craft click here.  Rebecca Kinkead – Artist Insights

Abbie Williams – A Studio Visit

03/23/2017 0 Comments
 

John and Abbie making a few "Choice" decisions.

At Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, all of our artists have strong connections to Maine and New England. With artist, Abbie Williams, Maine has come in and out of her life for as long as she can remember. However, recently her curiosity as both a woman and an artist has brought her back to the southwestern part of the United States and a place she has called home before; Taos, New Mexico.

Often, we are able to visit artists in their studios and see where their magic happens. It is not often that studio is in New Mexico. However, all the stars aligned in February, and we found ourselves in Taos and able to spend a wonderful day with Abbie and her husband, Bob.

Backyard Warm and Cozy

Over sixteen years ago, Abbie and Bob built their dream home at the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Made in the traditional southwestern adobe style, Abbie was the architect, and Bob was the Builder. With help from wonderful local contractors and the blessing of an exceptional sense of imagination and adventure, their perfect home and studio was created. Two years later life changed again and Maine called them home. They spent twelve years from Nobleboro to Monheagan Island as Abbie captured the beauty of this state. Maine has her heart, and for many years, her paint brush. Yet, things were about to change again.

“During my time in Maine, I visited the Taos area while house sitting for a friend,” says Abbie. “There is something about this area that has always called to me. Two years ago, when the opportunity to come back presented itself, I had to take it. There is a saying in Taos. ‘The mountain either accepts you or spits your out.’ I felt strongly that the mountain was calling me back.”

Since Abbie has returned to Taos, she has not only found the land she missed while back in Maine, she also found the house she missed. As fate would have it, the home and studio they designed and built was for sale.

Studio

“Years ago, we made a wonderful light space for my studio. It was a place that called me. It was still there, almost just as I left it. Here I can let down and relax. It’s more than just a place to paint. I meditate. I write. It’s a place for me to go and just be,” she says. “I am a believer in positive energy, and I need that to be part of my studio space. It’s just a peaceful spot.”

From her studio, Abbie looks out onto flower gardens, she planted years ago, not knowing if she would ever see them full grown. Gardening has always been one of her passions. She left parts natural and wild, but also added meditation paths to wander through. There is even a bench that began as a practice piece of Bob’s for their kitchen counter.

“Everything is the way we planned it. The bench was still here, waiting for me. Everything was still here,” she says. “I stand at the window in my studio, and say, ‘I did this.’ I planted everything around me. I created my little Garden of Eden here, and now I am able to come back and see it all grown up.”

Since her move back, she is stepping out and trying new things, especially where her work is concerned. Abbie has always been a very serious artist. She has used her talents to support herself. The importance of producing work was engrained in her. It was what she did for a living. It was her job. This is changing, too.

“I needed to get back in touch with my imagination. I lost that for a while and very realistic work was the result. I’m not sure what it’s going to look like this time,” says Abbie. “I fight with my internal New Englander as I begin to push the edges a little bit. I am still a Maine painter, but I want to bring a little more abstraction into my work, make it more contemporary.  I have very strong drawing skills, and I want to start using them more.”

For Abbie, there are choices to be made all the time. In the past, if she was using a photograph, she followed the picture. As she began pushing her limits, she began following the picture but took charge of her own color choices. Next, she began to move a subject or make it bigger or smaller.

A Sneak Peek

“At this point, I am finally free enough to start adding and subtracting. I can do whatever I feel like doing. I am no longer beholden to the image. If I want to copy it exactly I can, but I no longer have to, and I don’t feel bad about it,” she laughs. “I am starting to let go. I still feel a little guilty if I don’t go into the studio every day… but I don’t. Now the main point of it all for me… it has to be fun.”

Abbie Williams

Of course, the change in Abbie’s scenery has had an impact on her work. We will still see the classic Maine that we love, but there are changes, good changes, that are happening. Be the first to see some of her new work during the 2017 Choice Art Show. She has six amazing new pieces that will be up for your vote in May.  Be sure to watch for future posts about the Choice Art Show and, as always, you can see her work on her Artist Page.

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Winter Work – Trip Park

02/23/2017 0 Comments
 

Nomad

Much of the work that our artists accomplish for a summer season is actually created during the winter months. For many, the snow in New England brings quality and uninterrupted studio time. Summer is for celebration and winter is for work. With that said, we do continually receive new works from our artists from October to May. We keep our website up-to-date as they come in, and we post these new works on our social media sites. This February, in particular, found one of our artists very productive. And lucky for us, he agreed to send a few of his newest pieces to Kennebunk.

Trip Park tries to paint seven days a week.  If he is lucky, he can finish one new piece a day. It doesn’t always happen, but having the goal is important to Park.

“I’m going to quote Ralph Steadman again,” says Park. Steadman is a British artist Park enjoys. “He said, ‘Simply start a drawing and it will come out (on) the other end somehow. I won’t know how it is going to come out, and that’s the fascination – that makes it a worthwhile pursuit. If I knew what was going to happen before I started what would be the point of doing it?’ How cool is that? It’s a great way of disarming your psyche. I try to remember this throughout every painting. Blank canvases are like bullies, and I hate bullies! Every day is like a tiny ass-kicking on the playground for me.”

With that attitude, it is easy to see why the creative juices have been flowing in Park’s studio this winter. He is a perfect example of the celebration of summer coming out in the work of winter.

“When I was visiting Maine, I noticed little pops of color out of the corners of my eyes. It turned out that within all of these massive crates of wire and steel mesh of all these lobster traps, there were these brightly painted lobster buoys all over the docks,” says Park. “I thought to myself, there’s no way people would find a painting of those interesting, but I had to try it. I think I’ve done over fifty variations of them, now.”

Baby Buoys

Like Park’s ‘Buoy’ series, the colors and characters of Maine continue to appear in his work. He claims that it’s hard not to love a variety of color all at once. This is obvious in these new works, Storm Rider and Nomad. He is always consciously aware of what he sees and observes, keeping a running tally of ideas and concepts that are “on deck” and the next things up after his current pieces in progress.

“I love finding that combination of things I’ve done and new things I have not tried. However, I don’t attempt any painting I don’t want to create. I have to love each one, even just the thought of it, going in,” says Park. “I try to change things up with every painting, you could call it free-flowing. Paintings I do that make me happy are the ones that jump out and feel different than what I’ve done before.”

Chesapeake Charms Lilac LoverStorm Rider

Chesapeake Charms and Lilac Lover are wonderful examples of trying something new. If you know Trip Park’s work, these pieces are obviously his. Style and design are familiar, but there is new content and a fun energy in them that makes them unique. Of course as a gallery, we are always wondering what is coming next.

“My life is going to go where that creative inspiration takes me,” says Park in response to this. “I have no control over it, it’s just the nature of creating something out of nothing. As long as I work to my fullest potential every day… I’m happy.”

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And so are we.

We invite you to wander down to Kennebunk during the next few weeks.  The sun even comes out sometimes! We are open year-round, but check the website for specific times. As always, you can view our entire collection of work from Trip Park on our website. www.maine-art.com.

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Elizabeth Ostrander – Artist Insights

01/12/2017 2 Comments
 

Elizabeth Ostrander

Elizabeth Ostrander has not forgotten her “inner woman”.  She celebrates her with clay and a glaze of acrylic paint to make her come alive in so many of her sculptures. “The mystical and the mythical, the search for understanding and harmony, the conscious creation of self and community are essential parts of my female life and experience,” says Ostrander. “Female images in my sculptures reflect not only my own experiences as a woman, but also synchronicities beyond myself.” She believes in the power of this connection. It is a balance and a love, along with an understanding of the body as an expressive agent. This originated in her teens while a student of classical ballet in New York. “I found through dancing that our bodies are places of knowledge and revelation. Early in my childhood until my late teens I studied ballet and experienced my body’s emotional expression through movement. Today, I still love to dance. I enlighten my sculpting-self with my dancing-self by posing my own body in the position I want to sculpt,” says Ostrander. “I want to feel my sculpture both physically and emotionally from the inside out. Some artists find this through music, but it is the physicality of dance that becomes the physicality of my sculptures.” Nature, especially in Maine, also gives her enduring inspiration. In 1971, Elizabeth moved from New York to the coast of Maine, a move that holds no regret.
“Rural Maine has been my home since I moved from New York City, heeding the call of the then popular back-to-the-land movement. Like many others, I was filled with the idealism of the time, and wanted to live a self-directed life, close to Nature,” says Elizabeth. “I am still grateful for my unique and uprooted New York City childhood, and Eastport has its own distinctive history of artists finding their way to its beautiful shores. My Eastport colleagues and I continue that tradition.”
Grateful for her ability to continue the unfolding adventure of pursuing her work as an artist, Elizabeth celebrates being able to create what she needs. “The impulse to create is ancient.  I feel goosebumps when I picture that somewhere back in the days of early humans, someone reached down and pulled up a handful of mud and started shaping it – and something arose in this artist’s hands and mind that had never existed before. I like feeling I’m a part of this continuum. This passion to create has been my unfolding adventure in life.”

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Elizabeth has a wonderful collection of sculpture at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture in Kennebunk. She is always bringing in new work, and we encourage you to visit, as well check out her Artist Page on our website. Our January hours are Friday – Sunday, from 10-5.  Please feel free to call with any questions 207- 967-2803.

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Trip Park – Artist Insights

01/05/2017 1 Comment
 

Trip Park

Born in upstate New York – really, really far upstate New York – Trip Park “started” in the world of art by drawing. Not knowing where it would eventually lead, he took every opportunity to put pencil to paper. He didn’t just love to draw, he felt he had to draw – every and any place he could.

“For me, drawing was a zip-line to staying focused. I drew through high school and college,” says Park. “I created editorial cartoons at UNC, which was fun. Perhaps I had a never-diagnosed-case-of-ADD. If so, drawing was my natural Ritalin.”

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he majored in Journalism, but drawing lead him to advertising classes. A career in advertising, as an art director, soon followed. It wasn’t until five jobs later – an illustrator, a children’s book illustrator, an editorial cartoonist and an animation character designer – that he began painting.

“Let’s be clear. I never, ever wanted to paint!” laughs Park. “I painted with watercolor and gouache when I began illustrating, and I will never forget how messy it was. There was paint everywhere. Later, I illustrated children’s books on the computer. The drawing programs were so clean and simple. I loved the fact that there was no mess.”

It wasn’t until his wife decided to paint and sold her work first that the idea of painting became reality. Trip claims he was shamed into paint. Little did he know, after a few years of painting, he would finally turn himself over to “the mess.”

“I’m a pig-n-slop-slobby. There is paint everywhere in my studio. It is on me, on my clothes, in my hair,” Park says with a sigh. “I miss drawing on the computer.”

Trip works best in his studio, but owns the fact that it’s a complete chaos of art in progress. Paint truly is everywhere. With this, he knows it’s best to stay put. His studio is his creative space.

“It’s good I stay inside. People would be highly offended if I flung paint at them in public,” says Park. “Also, I’m a hoarder of many paints and need the routine of all of them surrounding my canvas. I don’t just want my studio, I need it.”

Amongst the artist clutter, there is  little about Trip’s process that stays consistent. It is a place he can explore and experiment. It’s always changing. He started with brushes, then for a while only used palette knives, and now he is back to brushes. The only constant; he must love what he creates.

“It stings a little each time one of my paintings leaves the studio; I really want to love each one before I let it go,” says Park. “I owe that to anyone who purchases one of my paintings. If I’m not happy with them, how should I expect anyone else to be?”

In this regard, Park is relentless. He doesn’t give up until he feels the work is his best. He admits to not meeting his own expectations sometimes, but the continued push is what makes his work great.

“I never quite get a piece exactly like I had hoped, but in the words of artist, Ralph Steadman, ‘Anything could be there (on the canvas)… I don’t go out of my way to be professional, I go out of my way to try and make something that is as unexpected to me as anyone else.’  This quote gives me solace,” says Park, “and I continue to paint.”

An example of a new thought process for me. These are parts of the campuses that I step on for months on end, then I have a thought...?

Trip Park has been with Maine Art for over two years now. We are lucky to have a fabulous collection of his work in the gallery at 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk. We welcome you to come visit and see it in person, but know it is also available to view online at www.maine-art.com/trippark.

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A Different Kind of Boat Builder – David Riley Peterson

11/18/2016 0 Comments
 

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The birth of David Riley Peterson’s boats was an interesting one. To say ‘one thing lead to another’ is an understatement, but it is still the best way to describe his ‘AH-HA’ moment.

Riley explains, “I was asked to make an olive tray for a local gift shop. Not seeing much challenge in it, I procrastinated until the third request. I returned to my studio and, reluctantly, rolled out a small thin slab of clay and folded it into a simple tray and joined the ends. It was a waste of my awesome talent.” Staring at it in dismay and disgust the little pod transformed. “I held it in my hands, and the ‘AH-HA’ moment occurred. The clay spoke and in a meek, shy voice it said, ‘I want to be a boat.’ Ever since that moment, I am a devoted (clay) boat builder,” laughs Peterson.

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His past and present blend a love of boats with playing in the mud. He is the first to admit that clay just suits his personality. Born in Beverly, Massachusetts, he was always reprimanded for playing in every mud puddle he could find. Growing up, there were no art classes, let alone ceramics, offered in school.

“I was clueless about clay until I went off to college. My dorm at the University of Florida was located across the street from the ceramics department. I was always curious about the group of students who entered and left the building dressed in dirty jeans or tattered shorts with every body part covered in clay; so I investigated,” says Peterson. “What I discovered instantly changed my life, and I could hardly wait until the next semester to enroll in my first ceramics class; ‘Introduction to Clay.’ I was not disappointed.”

Peterson went on to graduate with a BFA in Ceramics/Sculpture, own his own studio and teach. Since 1984, he has also been the President of Peterson Marine Surveys. Two careers that appear to be quite different, Peterson effectively merges into one life.

Peterson’s father was originally from Maine, and the family often came north during the summer. He remembers spending that time playing with boats. “Maine is a real fishing community. They used dories for fishing and pulling nets in, and stuff like that, but mostly lobstering. These boats were iconic watercraft years ago.” It wasn’t a stretch to add Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture to Peterson’s list of galleries.  His boats fit perfectly between images of seascapes and rocky coasts. The life-like quality he brings to his clay captures locals and tourists alike, and are a beautiful reminder of life in Maine.

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Come and see David Riley Peterson’s work in person at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk, Maine. We are open year-round. You can also view his work on our website at his Artist Page, David Riley Peterson at Maine Art. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call. 207-967-2803

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What’s Up with the Wind Sculptures!?

11/10/2016 0 Comments
 

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There are so many exciting and new goings on with Maine Art and Whitaker Studio, we thought we would take the time to catch you up.

Last week, Maine Art had the chance to get up close and personal with Whitaker Studio.  Not only were we able to see the studio and peek at the process, but we also spent some time with the staff. Thanks to a quick stop in St. Louis and a serious freezer stocking of Pappy’s BBQ, we treated them to a rib feed and caught up with the personal and professional side of the studio. They are a dedicated, hardworking and incredibly talented bunch.

Ironically, they were packing up a big ole crate with a Kennebunk shipping label.  Forty-five original Lyman Whitaker Wind Sculptures were snug inside, including a few of the new Gemini. Building a crate to hold this valuable cargo is almost as much of an art form as the sculptures themselves.

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Getting a good look at the new Gemini was another perk of the visit. The two double helix forms sitting at the top of the sculpture are hand cut to fit and interact perfectly with each other. When spinning, they never touch, but move so close they seem as one, like the twins they are named for. This new sculpture stands over ten feet tall and four feet wide.  The twins move independent of each other, while the bottom wind wheel rotates the entire sculpture.  The sculpture is not on the website as of yet, but a photo rendering can be seen on Maine Art Gallery’s Facebook Page, and of course outside of Maine Art on Western Ave. in Kennebunk.

Don’t forget! If you are planning to purchase a sculpture for the holiday gift-giving season, you must have your order in by December 9th to guarantee delivery for Christmas. Delivery will only be guaranteed for Small through X-Large sculptures that are in stock at the studio. You can of course visit the gallery and take one home with you as late as 1:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve.

Last, but certainly not least, is our Wind Sculpture Photo Contest! On November 14th, the 12 finalists’ photos will be posted on our Facebook Page, and you, our fans, can vote for your favorite. The finalist who’s photo receives the most “likes” as of 10 a.m. EST on Friday, December 2, will be this year’s winner of a Desert Flame by Lyman Whitaker.

Parsons

Throughout the holiday season the gallery will be open from 10am – 5pm every day. Please stop by and visit – new artwork arrives frequently and there is almost always something new to see. Our website is updated daily and is also a wonderful source for up-to-date inventory. www.maine-art.com  If we can help in anyway, never hesitate to call. 207-967-2803.

Follow this link to see all of Lyman Whitaker’s Wind Sculptures –  kennebunkportwindsculptures.com

Follow this link to read more about Whitaker Studio – Whitaker Studio Insights and Stories

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