Witbeck and his Women – Artist Insights on Nudes

10/12/2017 0 Comments
 
Witbeck and his Women – Artist Insights on Nudes

“The human figure has been subject matter for art forever,” says David Witbeck.

Witbeck has been working on figure drawing almost every week for several years. The drawings and sketches, however, piled up in his studio, unseen by anyone but him. Then one day, that changed. “I thought it would be fun to turn some of them into paintings. An artist should paint what he loves,” grins Witbeck. ‘Nough said.”

Psamathe by David Witbeck

These pieces evoke the classic, whimsical Witbeck style but, because they are based on drawings from observation opposed to the iconic fishermen culminated from memories and imagination, they are more anatomically correct in terms of proportion, though ever so slight in some cases. Witbeck doesn’t draw particularly realistically and is not into making beautifully finished renderings.

“Even when drawing from life, the figure is a point of departure to have fun with making shapes,” says Witbeck.  “The genesis of most of my figurative paintings are rough, one and two minute sketches.”

Nude I - Wood Block by David Witbeck

Just as the model is the point of departure for the original sketch, his sketch is a point of departure for the finished painting. Each step is a little further removed from the original, what many refer to as simulacra.

“Even the most gorgeous young model can become an ordinary, maybe even slightly frumpy, middle-aged beach babe or a voluptuous Nereid by the time she gets to my canvas,” he laughs of his deliberately unconventionally sexy women. “My emphasis is, as always, simplifying and exaggerating shapes and composing the surface of the canvas in a pleasing way.”

Elizabeth by David Witbeck Sirens II by David Witbeck Barbara by David Witbeck

To fill out the composition and give a counterpoint to the main subject there are occasional figures in the clouds and little creatures nearby.

“They are there mostly just for fun, but they are necessary. Maybe a Freudian would say that I’m that little voyeur gull,” laughs Witbeck, “but seriously, a basic element of good composition is a repetition of shapes.”

Witbeck’s women range from nude woodblock prints to his bathing suit-clad beach babes to his Nereids, who are a Witbeck version of the classic sea nymphs.

“They’re all great fun to paint. I especially love when I don’t need to worry about what color to paint their clothes.”

Artist David Wibeck David Witbeck’s Solo Show will run until Thursday, October 19 at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture at 14 Western Ave in Kennebunk, Maine.  He has completely taken over the first floor, and his show is a must-see for the fall season. Please click the links below to learn more about David Witbeck and his work. David Witbeck’s 2017 Solo Show David Witbeck  – A Year Round Collection of Available Work David Whitbeck – Artist Insights and Stories      

Painting Maine – Thoughts from David Witbeck

10/05/2017 0 Comments
 
Painting Maine – Thoughts from David Witbeck

Even though David Witbeck now lives in Rhode Island, Maine still holds a large portion of his heart and his work. He has so many memories he has created here and visits as often as he can. “Last October I spent a couple weeks recharging my Maine batteries and explored,” says Witbeck. “I wandered amongst the pole wharves of Friendship and Stonington, and visited many bays and harbors along the coast.”

Noontide by David Witbeck Haunted Island by David Witbeck

“This year I seem to have developed a fascination with pole wharves,” shares Witbeck. “They often look so spindly and fragile, and yet they withstand the coming and going of the tide and the bumping of boats against them.”

Image from Maine Encyclopedia

Pole wharves are a classic style that are often found in the fishing villages of Maine.

Witbeck loves walking low tide mudflats around and under the pole wharves. He spends a great deal of time looking for whatever secrets the receding water may have revealed. “Even though the pole wharves I visited don’t look a bit like the ones I painted, they certainly provided me with inspiration.  My work has always been more about what it feels like than what it looks like,” says Witbeck.

Lumpers by David Witbeck (wood cut) Town Landing by David Witbeck (wood cut) Menemsha Gulls by David Witbeck (wood cut)

Witbeck’s Solo Show at Maine Art Gallery also has a few new harbor paintings. “These pieces are based on the view of Camden and Penobscot Bay from Mt. Battie and Mt. Megunticook. The day was spectacularly beautiful, like so many autumn days in Maine,” he says. “Like all my work, they are essentially big shapes based ever so loosely on reality.”

Archipelago by David Witbeck Blue, Blue Bay by David Witbeck

Witbeck captures the Maine coast and all its wonders in a fun and interesting way. We welcome you to come and see this amazing show and challenge you not to smile.

David Witbeck

Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture is at 14 Western Ave in Kennebunk. We open every day at 10 am. Please check our website for daily closing hours as they will change with the seasons.  We do showcase Witbecks work all year round, however, this solo show will only be hanging through October 19.

Click this link to see the 360-degree virtual tour of Witbeck’s Solo Show

David Witbeck – A Solo Show

Click this link to read more about David Witbeck

David Witbeck – Artist Insights and Stories

Click this link to see our entire collection of Witbeck’s work

David Witbeck – Artist Page

The Shape of Things – Thoughts from David Witbeck

09/28/2017 0 Comments
 
The Shape of Things – Thoughts from David Witbeck

“All my work is essentially big shapes based ever so loosely on reality,” says David Witbeck.

Morning Commute by David Witbeck

Witbeck is one week into a three-week show at Maine Art Gallery.  He has taken over the entire first floor and this new collection of work is fabulous. His subjects range from pole wharves to harbor scenes to his classic fishermen and lobstermen.

“Regardless of what the nominal subject matter of my work may appear to be,” says Witbeck,  “to me, my paintings are about making interesting shapes and composing the surface of the canvas in a pleasing way.”

Be it the larger than life Hank, the fisherman, or the harbor of Blue, Blue Bay, it is easy to spot a Witbeck original work once you have seen one.

Hank by David Witbeck Blue, Blue Bay by David Witbeck

“I start just about every painting by drawing one big shape, the “subject” directly on the canvas. By default that leaves a second shape, the “background,” explains Witbeck. “I try to refine the two shapes so they’re both interesting. Even my landscape, seascape, and harbor scenes are essentially a sky or water shape combined with a land shape.”

After that the subject gets subdivided into smaller shapes. in the case of his fishermen, for example, to suggest clothing and such. Then other small shapes are attached to the primary shape to suggest the fish or the lobsters, or even the clever little seagull that finds his way into many of Witbeck’s pieces. “I usually add some little details to the background to suggest a boat, a gull or a piece of land, which creates the illusion of a middle ground.”

Bellbuoy in the Night by David Witbeck Patrick by David Witbeck Blue Harbor

“A compositional thing I do, which adds to the two-shape idea, is when I add these little details to the background, I usually ‘attach’ them either to the figure or to the edges of the canvas,” he explains how he keeps his work connected. “Few of my paintings have more than a couple ‘free-floating’ shapes. “That is, the shapes are not attached to one another nor to the edge of the canvas.”

This is by far the most diverse collection of Witbeck’s work we have seen here at Maine Art Gallery. We love the variety of both subject and size. It is truly a wonderful show. The work is simple and clean, but never loses the honest feel of Maine and the way it should be.

Witbeck’s Solo Show is at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk. It will run through October 23. We are open every day at 10 am. Please check the website or call for closing hours as they will change later in the fall. You can also see the entire show virtually by clicking the show link here.  David Witbeck – A Solo Show 2017

Click here for the website – www.maine-art.com or call  (207) 967 – 2803 FMI

To read more about David Witbeck click here – David Witbeck – Artist Insights

To see our entire collection of Witbeck’s work click here – David Witbeck – Artist Page

 

David Witbeck – A Solo Show at Maine Art Gallery

09/21/2017 0 Comments
 
David Witbeck – A Solo Show at Maine Art Gallery

Fans of artist David Witbeck might quickly – and rightfully so – associate him with a particular subject. “I’ve been painting my signature fishermen for eleven years,” Witbeck says. “They’ve become my identity as an artist, but it’s not all I am.”

Abner by David Witbeck

Witbeck’s recent work, which includes figurative and landscape pieces, will be on display for three weeks at Maine Art Gallery in Kennebunk, beginning Saturday, September 22. The artist will attend the opening reception that evening, from 5 to 7 PM.

Witbeck’s larger-than-life coastal characters have earned him many ardent followers. During recent years, however, the Rhode Island-based artist has focused his energies on other subjects. For example, last October he spent time in Maine, in Friendship and Stonington, so he could focus on pole wharves. Witbeck is drawn to their spindly and fragile appearance, which belies their ability to withstand the constant barrage of the tides.

Time and Tide by David Witbeck

“I love walking low-tide mudflats, around and under pole wharves, looking for whatever secrets the receding water may have revealed,” Witbeck says. While his subject matter may shift, his loose, bold, expressive style has not. “The actual wharves in these harbor villages don’t look a bit like the ones I painted for the show,” he says. “As always, my work has always been more about what it feels like than what it looks like.”

Yellow Harbor by David Witbeck

John Spain, Maine Art’s owner, says that Witbeck’s work evokes joy. “I’ve had the pleasure of representing David Witbeck for eight years and one of the most enjoyable parts is watching peoples’ first reactions to his work,” Spain says. “It begins with the smiles on their faces, and then they stand and really study each piece, the amazing compositions, and the masterful execution.”

Witbeck looks forward to discussing his work and his process at the opening. Maine Art Gallery is at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk. The gallery opens 10 AM daily. FMI, visit maine-art.com or call 967-2803.

Click to see the new show in a virtual 360-degree tour.

Click to see our entire collection of David Witbeck’s available works.

Click to read more about David Witbeck.

6th Annual Choice Art Show – “Beach Babes” by David Witbeck

06/18/2017 0 Comments
 

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David Witbeck’s work has a classic charm and character. He captures coastal life like no other New England artist. This year, however, he decided to use the Choice Art Show to play with another idea.

Witbeck says, “I’ve been painting my signature fishermen for eleven years. They’ve become my identity as an artist, but it’s not all I am.” David goes on to explain, “A couple years ago, I did a series of nudes that were great fun to do and a lot of people seemed to enjoy them. Yet, it takes a brave person to buy one and hang it in the family home,” he pauses, “though there were a couple.”

Time passed, and Witbeck’s pile of figure drawings continued to grow. Recently, he revisited the idea with the addition of bathing suits. This time painting his ‘girls’ in a more stylized manner.

“Before fishermen or BF as I like to say, I’d often create very minimalist paintings. The composition is much more important than the nominal subject matter. Think Milton Avery and Diebenkorn,” Witbeck refers to two influential painters.  “My new ‘beach babes’ incorporate the nudes of a couple years ago and early minimal paintings of ten-plus years ago. Conceptually they are not that far removed from the rest of my oeuvre.”

Kirsten NancyElizabeth

The underlying concern in all Witbeck’s work is composition, shape, and, to a lesser extent, color. It’s more obvious in the Beach Babes.

“I struggled hard not to model the shapes to give the illusion of a third dimension. They’re deliberately flat. Although, I couldn’t stop myself from penciling in the suggestion of facial features,” says Witbeck. “Then I decided to name them with common names, just as I do with the fishermen and lobstermen.”

David did comment that the names may or may not reference real women, in case anyone is wondering. Here at Maine Art, we love celebrating the women of summer in all shapes in sizes.

David Witbeck

If you are interested in getting to know all the Beach Babes, visit Maine Art Shows from June 10th to June 29th to see the 6th Annual Choice Art Show in person. We are located at 10 Chase Hill Road in Kennebunk. The gallery is open every day from 11AM – 5PM. FMI, please call at 207-967-0049 or email at info@maine-art.com.

Click the logo to see the complete show online.

To view our complete collection of Witbeck’s Work – David Witbeck – Artist Page

To read more about David Witbeck, his process, and his work – David Witbeck – Artist Insights

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The Witbeck Boys of Summer

06/02/2016 0 Comments
 

Amos, Wade, Lumper, Newman, Eliot, and Barry. They work the local docks. They are Mainers, born and raised. They are coastal life personified. They are the iconic fisherman of David Witbeck. And from now until June 16, you will find these boys on the walls of Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture.

Through the years we have become quite familiar with Witbeck’s fishermen. Still, questions remain. Where did they come from? And more importantly, how did they find their way into Witbeck’s studio? Lucky for us, Witbeck is not only an artist but a storyteller.

As a freelance photographer, he used to love to go out on commercial fishing vessels when he had free time. Often, he toyed with the idea of doing an extended photo-essay, but he could never justify the amount of time away from ‘paying jobs.’ “Truth be told, I usually had more fun talking with the crews and helping to sort fish than making pictures,” says Witbeck, thinking back on the memory.

When he later started painting, fishing seemed to be the natural subject matter for him. “I wanted my paintings to be iconic rather than descriptive. For descriptive focus, photography would have been a better way to do it. I wanted to paint.” Initially, it was just for the fun of it, but then one morning about ten years ago, just before waking up, he found his inspiration.

“I had had one of those wonderful little REM sleep dreams. A guy was holding a fish. There just happened to be a sketchbook on the floor beside the bed, and I made this little ten-second doodle,” laughs Witbeck. “The rest is history.”

FMDoodle copy-1

They have certainly come a long way.

And so goes the story of how Amos, Wade, Lumper, Newman, Eliot, and Barry came to spend the first part of this summer at Maine Art in David Witbeck’s one-man show. We welcome you to come and meet these characters for yourself. They are even more spectacular in person. The gallery is open every day from 10am – 5pm at 14 Western Avenue in Kennebunk. If you aren’t able to make it in, view the entire show at www.maine-art.com. For more Witbeck, view our complete collection by clicking his Artist Page.

A David Witbeck Side Note –

“I also made another doodle, tentatively called, ‘The Last Fish.’ Yet, after ten years, and more than 300 fisherman paintings, I haven’t quite got to it yet.” For a few reasons we, as loyal Witbeck fans, hope the last fish never comes.

thelastfish copy-1

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David Witbeck – Celebrating the Start of Summer

05/26/2016 0 Comments
 

On Saturday, May 28th, help us at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture to celebrate the beginning of summer in the Kennebunks the best way we know how; with David Witbeck, New Work.

DavidWitbeck

Witbeck is an artist with a special talent, a unique eye and an unconditional love for coastal life. His canvases are full of characters from working fishing villages and harbor towns. He captures the fabulous personality of the lobsterman and the sarcastic sass of the seagull while maintaining the charm and appeal of New England. He has an appreciation for their hard work, but also for their humor. “I’m most pleased when my paintings evoke smiles. Humor is an element too often missing in art,” says Witbeck. Living and working the Maine coast takes a sense of humor.  This is evident in the subjects of his paintings.

Witbeck_Family Business

Witbeck is no stranger to the working man. From truck driver to school teacher, journalist to photographer, he held many a job before finding success as an artist. His path was not straight or easy, but lucky for us he found his way. “I never had a studio as a photographer, always working on location, but in 2003 I rented a mill space to paint in in my spare time,” says Witbeck. It wasn’t long before his spare time became full-time. “By 2007, I was selling enough art to turn down the occasional photo job that came my way… and the rest is history,” he says with a humility we have grown to love at Maine Art.

That same humility comes though when Witbeck speaks of his mentors and his development as an artist. “When I first started painting again in 2001, after not having painted since 1968, I painted watercolors,” he says. It started out as a practical decision. “I found painting en plein air with acrylics next to impossible. The paint dried so fast on hot windy days, and oils made a mess of the leather upholstery on my then brand-new Outback,” he laughs. All that was left were watercolors.

Witbeck_Clammers

It was then David discovered Edgar Whitney, a kind of guru for many watercolor painters. “The most important thing I took from him,” says Witbeck, “is his definition of an artist.” It was an epiphany of sorts to discover he didn’t have to change the course of Art History. He didn’t have to have something earthshaking to say. He didn’t have to alter the world. “According to Edgar Whitney,” David paraphrases, “an artist is simply a shape maker, a symbol finder and an entertainer.” This was Witbeck’s proverbial “ah-ha” moment. “Wow! What a relief. I can do that,” he laughs.

And that he can. His new show is full of interesting shapes and symbols that represent coastal life, and even a few rare pieces influenced by of his own life. Witbeck doesn’t often work from photographs. “Every once in a while,” he admits, “a photograph will trigger an idea.” Lobstah for Suppah and A Fine Catch are examples of these triggers; they were both inspired by a dory built by the Landing School in Arundel and a fond memory shared with his wife from the summer of ’88.

Witbeck_Lobstah for Suppah Witbeck_A Fine Catch

This show is going to be a great deal of fun,” says gallery director Amy Lewia. “David is a character himself. Having him at the opening on the 28th will allow our customers an exciting chance to meet the man behind the work.” The Artist’s Reception will be held at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk, from 5-7 pm, and all are welcome to join.

These larger-than-life works and this incredibly talented artist need much more than just a night, so the celebration will last for three weeks. Through June 16th, David Witbeck’s show can be seen at Maine Art. We are open daily from 10 am to 5 pm. For more information please call 207-967-2803. The show can also be viewed online at www.maine-art.com starting today. Works will be available for purchase at 10 a.m. on Saturday. Come and celebrate summer on the coast of Maine. There is nothing like it anywhere else in the world.

Read more about David Witbeck and his work on Maine Art’s Blog.

See our entire collection of Witbeck work on his Artist Page.

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The 2016 Summer Season

04/21/2016 0 Comments
 

As everyone in Maine begins to celebrate the coming of spring, here at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture, we are already looking toward the coming summer. Which means… The Summer Show Schedule! We have planned four single-artist shows and one group show.  All will contain new and unique pieces from many of our amazing artists.

Normally, our summer shows are held up on Chase Hill in the Maine Art Shows gallery. However, this year we are starting a bit early, and thought it would be fun to have our first show right on the first floor of the 14 Western Ave. location. And who will we be kicking off the summer with? David Witbeck, of course.

David’s solo show will run from May 28th to June 16th, and will not only feature his classic men of Maine and coastal working life images, but a few new perspectives on the wonderful state we love. You can still see many original Witbecks in the gallery and online on his Artist Page, but be sure to check his online show catalog for new work. It will be live soon! Even better, put your name on our mailing list to receive a reminder when his new work from the show is available. While you are waiting, please click here to learn more about David and his work.

 zjvxzv0cxlwyygtlg6viDavid Witbeck: May 28, 2016 – June 16, 2016

Maine Art Shows, at 10 Chase Hill Rd., will again host the Choice Art Show from June 11th through June 30th. This show not only features twelve of our top artists, it is also the only show that lets you, the public, vote for the work you want to see on our walls.  Voting doesn’t begin until May 2. Again, watch for the link or join our mailing list to get a behind-the-scenes peek at this one-of-kind show.

uumc8naysstx3ynamil0Choice Art Show, 2016: June 11, 2016 – June 30, 2016

On July 2nd, one of our new artists will open her solo show at Maine Art Shows. Holly Ready is no stranger to the gallery, but this will be her first solo show with us.  A few examples of her work are in the gallery now and on her Artist Page, but for the first three weeks in July all the walls of Maine Art Shows will display her stunning landscapes and a few more wonderful surprises. We are happy to send you a reminder when this show catalog is available to view if you join our mailing list.

c1isqitsm1c7fqjelot7Holly Ready: July 02, 2016 – July 21, 2016

  In the spirit of celebrating our new artists, we will also be featuring Rebecca Kinkead this summer.  Her solo show begins on July 23rd and will run through August 11th. Rebecca’s work is nationally known and celebrated, and we are very excited to be able to share it with you here in Maine. To learn a bit about Rebecca, visit her Artist Page or click here to read more. lrddpjxq6ngwqsrguyahRebecca Kinkead: July 23, 2016 – August 11, 2016

There is no better way to end a perfect summer than a William B. Hoyt show.  His timeless works capture his travels in both grand sweeping landscapes and with the tiniest of detail. He celebrates Maine and New England like no other. His show opens on August 13th and runs through Labor Day. Click here to read a bit more about Hoyt or visit his Artist Page to see our present collection of his work.

 ewrgividky3zvrwhhg21 William B. Hoyt: August 13, 2016 – September 05, 2016

This summer holds a plethora of talent and personality that embodies who were are here at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture. We look forward to celebrating this summer season with you and yours. There are so many ways to stay updated on what is going on here. Be sure to check out the links below. We look forward to seeing you soon here in Kennebunk, Maine.

Our Website – www.maine-art.com

Our Blog – www.maine-art.com/blog

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/MaineArtGallery

Twitter – https://twitter.com/maineartgallery

Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com/maineartgallery/

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/maineartgallery/

First Lives – David Witbeck

03/03/2016 0 Comments
 

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“As a kid, I thought I wanted to be an artist… or maybe a musician,” says David Witbeck. “As a high school senior my choices were music school in Potsdam, NY (the boonies, -40 in the winter), or Art School in the Big Apple. What would you choose?”

Did he choose New York City? Yes. He studied at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn for three years. Did he stay in New York? Yes. However, after quickly becoming “disenchanted with the crazy New York art scene of the time,” he read The Painted Word by Tom Wolfe, and photography seemed like a much more relevant pursuit.  He became aware of, “nitty-gritty black and white street photography and photojournalism.” He transferred to Rochester Institute of Technology. Rochester was not only home to a photography program, but also to his then pregnant girlfriend. “Ah, the 60’s,” says Witbeck as he looks back.

“A very young marriage and parenthood necessitated finding whatever work I could,” says David. Darkroom assistant, wheelchair mobile driver, employment counselor…the irony! He eventually took a job as a yearbook photographer. Still not art, but getting there. After three years he quit and took a job with a small weekly newspaper. “The pay was less, but I could build up my photojournalism portfolio.” Art, right?

“Eventually frustration, poverty, disappointment, etc., led to divorce, at which point I decided to ‘bleep’ it all and just drive a truck,” says Witbeck. Sometimes taking a step back is necessary in order to take a step forward. After a year of driving a small fish-delivery truck, he made the decision to go big or go home. “As long as I am driving a truck, I should drive a ‘real’ truck,” he had thought. He took lessons, received his NY Class 1 license, and for the next six years was a Teamster driving tractor-trailers. Now that, ladies and gentleman, is an art.

“Driving trailers could be great fun in good weather, but a little terrifying in Rochester winters when, by March, there could be ten feet of accumulated snow,” David recalls. With the threat of becoming an old Teamster, he applied and was accepted to Rhode Island School of Design in 1980. Finally, the world of art had found its way back into his life.

He sold just about everything he owned and moved to Providence. “I graduated with a BFA in photography in 1982 at the age of thirty-five.” He had a couple beat-up cameras, a few sticks of furniture, his clothes, a few thousand in debt… and the promise of a job with a major daily newspaper to his name. “The job failed to materialize. The photo editor wanted me, Human Resources demanded a woman… I was the wrong gender. What now!?”

Lucky for us the “what now?” ended up eventually putting him on a path to the larger-than-life seaside fishing and lobstering paintings that grace the walls of Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture.  Alongside them hang the picturesque scenes of harbor villages and coastal life that Witbeck is known for in New England.  In May, Maine Art is lucky enough to be hosting a one-man show of David Witbeck’s work; offering more insight into this fascinating man, his history and the what, where and who that finally helped him find this Artist’s Life.

Dory

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Photographs and Memories – David Witbeck and Fishwife

12/03/2015 0 Comments
 

If a picture is worth a thousand words, a painting is worth a million. Why? It has freedom. It doesn’t have to be exact.  It is better – above what can be captured on film. David Witbeck was a freelance photographer for almost thirty years, so it is not a surprise that he is sometimes asked if he works from photographs. “I don’t,” says Witbeck. “It’s a joy to be freed from the bonds of the objective reality and just make stuff up.” However, as we all can attest to, rules are made to be broken. “Every once in a while though” he admits, “a photograph will trigger an idea.”

Dory

“Several months ago my wife and I were looking through piles of old snapshots and came across a picture of us, circa 1988,” shares David. In the background of the photo a beautiful 17’ Swampscott Dory can be seen. It was built by the Landing School in Kennebunk. “We used to rent a house in Tenant’s Harbor for the month of August. We rowed almost every day, regardless of the weather. We had many wonderful times with that little boat.”

David thought it would be fun to somehow use the photo in his art and started a painting. “It became too much of a copy of the photograph, so I abandoned it. It still sits unfinished, face against my studio wall.” Luckily for us, the photograph continued to poke at his imagination. “I kept looking at the photo. I knew there was something that eventually would come from it.”  One morning, months later, he walked into his studio, picked up a piece of charcoal and in an hour or so had a drawing that resulted in one of his most recent woodblock prints, “Fishwife”.

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Presently, this woodblock print hangs in the Holiday Show at Maine Art Paintings and Sculpture. We welcome you to come to the gallery on 14 Western Ave. in Kennebunk to get a first had peek at this print, as well as the rest of the Holiday Show.  We are open from 10 – 5 everyday.  The show will run until December 31st. Remember, you can also see the show on-line at www.maine-art.com.

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